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Portsmouth: os melhores parques

Parque
“The Common is home to a remarkable collection of mature elm trees, believed to be the oldest and largest surviving in Hampshire, which have escaped Dutch elm disease owing to their isolation. The majority of the larger trees are Huntingdon Elms planted in the 1920s, but nearer the entrance to the Skate Park there is a fine example of a hybrid of the Siberian Elm Ulmus pumila. Huntingdon Elms once lined the Ladies' Mile—an avenue through the centre of the Common—but many were lost in the Great Storm of 1987 and replaced by the Dutch hybrid elm cultivar 'Lobel'. The Ladies' Mile is also home to several semi-mature Canary Island Date Palms Phoenix canariensis. Planted in 1996, these palms are now some of the largest in the UK and for the last few years have fruited and produced viable seed, the first time this species of palm has been recorded doing so in the UK. Other palms growing close to the Common include Trachycarpus fortunei, (Ladies' Mile, Rock Gardens and Rose Garden), Chamaerops humilis (in front of the Pyramids Centre), Butia capitata (in Burgoyne Gardens) and Brahea armata, (Canoe Lake and D-Day Island). Many Cordyline australis are also planted in the area, though these are not true palms, but more closely related to yuccas and agaves. Lovely place for a quiet walk. safe for young kids on their bikes or scooters. It has a couple of cafes, and even a small garden centre! There is a skate-park for the older kids, and a free splash area for the younger ones during the summer months. Every year some superb events are held on the common - including "Victorious" music festival, the International Kite Festival, Race for Life, The Great South Run, Forces Day, Shire Horses etc”
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“Lovely green space in the middle of the town. Great for a picnic! Also an excellent easy walking shortcut to the train station.”
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“Outdoor park with concrete rinks, ramps & rails, for skateboards, BMXs, scooters and roller blades. Mini-wheeler sessions. Roller Disco summer sessions with the best DJs and live music. There are helmets, skates, skateboards and a limited number of scooters available to hire at reasonable rates. Please note that they recommend all users to wear helmets and all under 16s must do so. The iconic image of the skatepark is the bandstand, situated in the centre of the skatepark and built in 1928 as a traditional bandstand, surrounded by grass. In the 1930s a paved area was laid around the bandstand for dancing and for roller skating, surrounded by a low fence. Southsea Skatepark is arguably the oldest skatepark in the World, with the current ‘rink’ area dating back to a roller rink that was first built back in the 1950s. Back in the 70s and 80s the rink was only used for roller hockey. The skatepark was remodelled in the 1970s with concrete (bowls, snakerun, etc) and then modified again in 1990 with a new bowl replacing the old reservoir. In the mid to late 90s the rink area was built on with new ledges, banks, rails and ramps and in the last ten years two new mini ramps and a replacement vert ramp have been built. "We’re possibly the oldest and most iconic Skatepark in the UK – and celebrated our 40th birthday last year! We open all year round and welcome everyone from beginners to pros. Since 2011, Southsea Skatepark has been run as a charity. Every penny we raise goes towards improving the park and it’s facilities." The skatepark periodically holds contests catering for BMX, inline, scooters and skateboarding. BMX shop on site. Southsea Skatepark reflects it’s age, mixing the legendary concrete from the 70s as one of the first skateparks in the UK , with the contemporary street/park section, which includes a state of the art vert ramp, spine mini, and a 4ft metal mini around by the cafe. Southsea Skatepark covers a range of styles, from the snake run bowl that encourages carving and creative lines to the pool slalom run bowl that has just had a small box jump added to the top of the run. Next there's the mogul and keyhole bowl that link together and have brought so much history to the park, it’s fair to say visitors come and go and respect anything done in the keyhole bowl which is approx 16ft deep. It definitely adds that legit tag to anything you can do in it. What was originally the banked freestyle kick turn area, has now had a state of the art 14ft high / 40ft wide vert ramp with skate lite surface added. Next to the vert (surrounding the iconic bandstand) there's a flat bank hip and pyramid grind rail that flows into a 4ft hip into the skate rink.”
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Playground
“The historic Hilsea Lido dates back to 1932, and has been enjoyed by generations ever since. Today, Hilsea Lido is a 67m long unheated pool, 1m deep at the shallow ends, and with a 4.5m deep diving pit. There's also a 2m diving platform in the middle. The Ladies and Gents facilities have individual changing and shower cubicles. Wetsuits are permitted. Beach shoes rather than bare feet are recommended for walking around the site. There are also wide doors and ramps to ensure everyone is able to enjoy the water. A small number of swim aids and water games are available, though swimmers are welcome to bring their own. During fun sessions the pool is divided to ensure safe management of the diving platform, which is open if sufficient lifeguards are available. 'Just Swim' sessions are for adults only, the whole length of the pool is available but the diving platform is not. Outside of the pool, there are picnic tables and plenty of space for sunbathing. Visitors are also welcome to bring their own seating and picnic supplies. Alternatively, why not head over to the Blue Lagoon to sample the homemade cakes, tea, coffee and various hot and cold lunches! You'll also find ice creams and ice cold drinks. For the more adventurous there is a long lake where you can hang onto a zip wire and surf!”
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Lake
“CANOE LAKE AT SOUTHSEA SEAFRONT The open space containing Canoe Lake and the Rose Garden, is located on the seafront just to east of South Parade Pier, dates from 1886. The Canoe Lake area has a wide variety of landscapes ranging from the grassland area close to the lake, to the formal planting of the Rose Gardens within the remains of Lumps Fort. Canoe Lake was constructed from a remnant of the Great Morass, a large area of marshland that was centred north east of Southsea castle, the majority of the Great Morass was drained during the early 19th century. Canoe Lake was opened on 17th June 1886 by the Mayor, A.S. Blake, Esq and was initially used for sailing model yachts but was quickly ”
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“It has two FREE tennis courts! And children area, running circuit and space for lawn bowls. ”
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“On Southsea’s sunny seafront there’s a pretty spot with some compelling history. Actually, there are quite a few. Most of them are fairly well-known (no-one’s going to miss the Naval Memorial), but few Portsmuthians seem to be aware of Lumps Fort. Certainly, almost nobody knows it by that name. That’s because Lumps Fort doesn’t really exist anymore. The fortified walls remain, as well as a few mounts for defensive guns and the like. These days, however, the fort is better known for being the home of Southsea Rose Garden. The “current” fort was built in the mid-to-late 1800s, but it has been a fortification since at least as far back as 1805, possibly dating back centuries. Part of the semaphore line between London and HMNB Portsmouth ran through Lumps – but as a good chunk of the fort fell into the sea during this period, it doesn’t seem like it was particularly well-looked-after even then. The fort’s main claim to fame was serving as the training facility for Operation Frankton, where, in 1942, a team of Royal Marines executed a daring commando raid on the German-occupied port of Bordeaux. The mission led to six ships being successfully sabotaged, at the cost of the eventual deaths of all but two of the marines. A plaque outside Lumps Fort commemorates the “Cockleshell Heroes” (named after the “cockle” kayaks used) involved in this imaginative and courageous raid. A film of the same name was made in 1955. The majority of the old fort is now occupied by Southsea Rose Garden. In bloom, the garden is stunning, and is said to have up to forty varieties of roses on display. The Rose Garden also contains what seems to be the only clue that Portsmouth is twinned with the city of Maizuru, in Japan. The “Japanese Garden” might be a little dilapidated now, but it stills possesses a bit of the charm it must have had when it was new. While pretty, the Japanese Garden is fairly small, so when you’ve finished with it a brief stroll will lead you up a few steps and to the top of the fort’s walls, where, on a good day, you’ll get a fantastic view over the Solent to the Isle of Wight. The numerous memorials on the nearby benches suggest the views have made a similar impression on more than a few people. Once you’re had your fill of Lumps Fort and Nearby you’ll find Southsea Model Village, as well as Canoe Lake and Portsmouth’s own Natural History Museum, Cumberland House – all well worth a look.”
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“Wildlife reserve on the edge of Portsmouth. Great for bird lovers as many migratory species come here. Don't forget your binoculars!”
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