Pular para o conteúdo

Principais recomendações de pontos turísticos dos moradores locais

Castelo
“Located in Prague's Hradcany neighborhood, Prague Castle (Pražský hrad), once the home of Bohemia's kings, is today the official residence of the Czech Republic's President and one of the city's most visited tourist attractions. Originally built as a walled fortress around AD 870, the castle has changed dramatically over the years and contains examples of most of the leading architectural styles of the last millennium. Within the castle walls are a number of Prague's most popular tourist sites, including St. Vitus Cathedral, St. George's Basilica, the Powder Tower, the Old Royal Palace, and the Golden Lane. The largest castle complex in the world, this vast fortress requires considerable time to tour, but it's time well spent (particularly rewarding are the excellent views over the Vltava River with the old town and its many beautiful spires in the background). Highlights include the Old Royal Palace's main hall, the Vladislav Hall, so large it could be used for jousting tournaments, and staircases wide enough to allow mounted knights to use them. Be sure to also spend time in the Royal Garden, dating back to 1534 and home to a number of superb old buildings, including the Ball Game Pavilion, the Royal Summer House with its Singing Fountain, and the Lion's Court. The best way to fully explore the castle is on a Prague Castle Walking Tour. Also check the castle's official website for news and updates regarding cultural events, such as classical music concerts, lectures, and workshops. One of the top things to do at night in Prague is to find a good spot from which to enjoy the castle illuminations that light this magnificent structure in a range of hues. In fact, basing yourself in a hotel in the vicinity of Prague Castle is a good idea, so you can experience the city highlights by day and night. Address: 119 08 Praha 1”
  • 409 moradores locais recomendam
Ponte
“The most famous bridge in Czech Republic with very rich history. Some tourist attractions are located on the bridge during your walking (e. g. picture painting of your face). In the morning is the best time you can visit :) Breathtaking view to Prague´s castle as well.”
  • 295 moradores locais recomendam
Monumento / ponto turístico
“The historic center of Prague, the Old Town (Staré Mesto) is where you'll find the splendid Old Town Square (Staromestské námestí), one of the best places to begin exploring the city. Here, you'll find the Tyn Church and the Clementinum, along with numerous other fine old churches, as well as splendid old architecture dating back as far as the 11th century, while the Jewish Quarter, Josefov, is just a short walk north. A highlight is the Old Town Hall (Staromestská radnice), home to the wonderful early 15th-century Astronomical Clock (orloj). Each hour, it springs to life as the 12 Apostles and other figures appear and parade in procession across the clock face. Other Old Town Hall highlights are the Gothic doorway leading to its splendid interior with its art exhibits and displays, a chapel built in 1381, and an old prison. Be sure to make the ascent (by stairs or elevator) to the top of the Old Town Hall Tower for its fine views over Prague. Address: Staromestské námestí, 110 00 Praha 1”
  • 165 moradores locais recomendam
Praça
“Old Town Square Dating from the 12th century, the square has witnessed many a significant event. Beside the Old Town Hall and the Church of Our Lady before Tyn, the square has several other dominants - the baroque St. Nicholas church (K. I. Dienzenhofer, 1732 - 1735), the rococo Kinsky palace housing the National Gallery graphic collection, the Stone Bell house - a gothic palace from the 14th century, now the Municipal Gallery concert and exhibition rooms, as well as the Master Jan Hus Memorial sculptured by Ladislav Saloun (1915). The square witnessed the execution of 27 Czech noblemen on 21 June, 1621 - in memory of that event, 27 crosses are marked in the pavement. The Prague meridian can be seen not far from there. The Old Town Hall with the Astronomical Clock (horologe) The Town Hall was founded in 1338. In 1364, the tower was joined to a chapel and in 1470, the Town Hall was rebuilt in the Gothic style. The clock dates from the beginning of the 15th century; on the hour, a procession of the Twelve Apostles appears the window in the upper part. In the lower part, there are 12 medallions with the signs of the zodiac, created by Josef Manes (1865). The eastern wing of the Town Hall was destroyed on May 8, 1945, and has not been rebuilt yet. Church of Our Lady before Tyn (Tynsky chram) Second only to the St. Vitus Cathedral, it is the most remarkable Gothic church with a Baroque interior in Prague. It contains the tomb of famous astronomer Tycho de Brahe. Part of the iterior is being renovated at present. Tyn Yard (Tynsky dvur - Ungelt) One of the places of a great historical value. A block of houses between the Tynska, Stupartska and Mala Stupartska streets. It probably dates back to the 11th century. Originally a fortified merchant yard where the duty on goods called ungelt (the whole area was given this name) was collected. Traces of all important architectural styles that appeared in Prague can be found in Ungelt. The most important building is the Granovsky Palace - one of the best preserved renaissance jewells in Prague. Prague Jewish Town (Prague Ghetto) (Prague 1, Old Town, close to The Square) It dates back to the 13th century but its present appearance is mainly the result of a vast redevelopment action undertaken between 1893 - 1913. Only a few most significant buildings were saved, the living testimony of the history of Prague Jews which lasted for many centuries. Yet these buildings form the best present complex of Jewish historical monuments in the whole Europe. Six synagogues remain from this old settlement which includes the Jewish Town Hall and the Old Jewish Cemetery - the most remarkable in Europe. Except the Old-New Synagogue they are part of the Jewish Museum Old-New Synagogue (Staronova synagoga) (Prague 1, Cervena street) The oldest preserved synagogue in Central Europe. It was built in the early Gothic style in the late 13th century and richly adorned by stonework. Jewish Museum (Zidovske muzeum) (Prague 1, U Stare skoly 1) Old Jewish Cemetery (Stary zidovsky hrbitov) (Prague 1, Siroka street) Established in the mid-15th century it served as a burial site till 1787. Among 12 000 gothic, renaisance and baroque tombstones are also those of Rabbi Jehuda Loew (1609) and Mordechai Maisel (1601). Pinkas Synagogue (Pinkasova synagoga) (Prague 1, Siroka 3) Permanent exhibition: A memorial to 77 297 Holocaust victims. Drawings of childern from the Terezin concentration camp. Maisel Synagogue (Maiselova synagoga) (Prague 1, Maiselova 10) The neo-Gothic synagogue replaced the original Renaissance building built by Maisel and destroyed by fire. Klaus Synagogue (Klausova synagoga) (Prague 1, U Stareho hrbitova 1) A Baroque building near the cemetery entrance. Permanent exhibition: Jewish customs and traditions. Spanish Synagogue (Spanelska synagoga) (Prague 1, Vezenska 1) Named after its Moorish interior. Permanent exhibition: History of the Jews in Bohemia and Moravia since their emancipation until now. Powder Tower (Prague 1, Na Prikope) A Gothic building from 1475 erected by Matthias Rejsek, and once probably used to store gunpowder. Modified in 1875-86. The Municipal House (Prague 1, namesti Republiky 5) An Art Noveau building constructed in 1905 - 1911 (A. Balsanek, O. Polivka) on the site of the former king's court, a seat of the kings of Bohemia from the end of the 14th century until 1438. The rich interior and exterior decorations are the works of A. Mucha, M. Svabinsky, J. V. Myslbek, and others. The monumental Smetana concert hall forms the centre of the building being the place of the International Music Festival Prazske Jaro (Prague Spring), other concerts and important social events. Betlehem Chapel (Prague 1, Betlemske namesti) Originally a Gothic chapel dating from 1391. The famous religious reformer Master Jan Hus preached there. Completely damaged, the building was reconstructed in 1950-53 based on old engravings and pictures (architect J. Fragner). The Estates Theatre (Prague 1, Ovocny trh 1) Opened in 1783 as the Nostic Theatre. The premiere of Mozart's opera Don Giovanni was given here on October 29, 1787. From 1799 the theatre belonged to the Czech Estates. On December 21, 1834, the song "Kde domov muj" (O, Homeland Mine) which later became the Czech national anthem, was premiered there. Today hosts drama, opera and ballet performances. Rudolfinum The most precious "burgess house" dating from the Middle Ages. Originally Romanesque, later rebuilt in the Gothic style. Currently, it serves as an exhibition and concert hall. Carolinum (Prague 1, Ovocny trh 5) The original Charles University building, established in 1348. A Gothic bay chapel from 1370 was rebuilt in the Baroque style in 1718. At present, Charles University graduation ceremonies take place there. There is a gallery on the ground-floor. ”
  • 201 moradores locais recomendam
Museum
“Fresh from a seven-year-long renovation, the National Museum (Národní Muzeum) in Prague is spread across a number of locations and houses numerous important collections representing a variety of fields, with literally millions of items covering mineralogy, zoology, anthropology, and archaeology, as well as the arts and music. The entomology collection alone numbers more than five million specimens. The oldest museum in the Czech Republic, it was established in the early 1800s before moving to its current location in 1891. A particularly enjoyable highlight is the archaeology exhibit with its extensive collection of 1st-and 2nd-century Roman artifacts, along with numerous Bronze and Early Iron age finds. (For a comprehensive list of all locations and collections, visit the National Museum's website, below.) Another museum to include on your must-visit list is the excellent National Technical Museum (Národní technické museum), which documents the many technological advances the country has contributed to, including displays of machinery and equipment built here over the years, from automobiles to aircraft. Address: Václavské námestí 68, 115 79 Praha 1”
  • 112 moradores locais recomendam
Edifício
“The Dancing House (Tancící dum), Prague's most outstanding modern architectural creation, was built between 1992 and 1996 to designs by Frank Gehry. Consisting of two adjoining towers, this splendid structure features unique curves that resemble two dancing figures, an effect heightened by the fact one of the towers is shaped like a woman wearing a skirt (hence the nickname "Fred and Ginger" after famous American dancers Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers). While the building consists largely of offices and a hotel, great views can be enjoyed from the top floor restaurant (a café is also located on the main level). Address: Jiráskovo námestí 1981/6, 120 00 Praha 2”
  • 176 moradores locais recomendam
Monumento / ponto turístico
“The best view in the city! Try it at the day of good visibility, there is 360 degrees view point”
  • 253 moradores locais recomendam
Castelo
“Looking like something out of a fairy tale, the Vyšehrad fortress—literally translated as the "Upper Castle," or the "Castle on the Heights"—stands high above the Vltava River overlooking Prague. Known to have been in existence as far back as the 10th century, it has long been the subject of myth and legend, including the foretelling of an ancient princess of the rising of a great city around it. Once the royal residence of Vratislav II, Vyšehrad also played a role as part of the original Royal Route taken by kings about to be crowned, who would have to stop here to pay tribute to their predecessors (the route led from Vyšehrad to Hradcany). Although now largely ruins, the fortress is a wonderful place for a stroll or picnic and offers superb views of the surrounding city. During the summer months, the attraction's open air theater hosts musical and theatrical performances. English language guided tours can be arranged. Address: V pevnosti 159/5b, 128 00 Praha 2”
  • 158 moradores locais recomendam
Local Histórico
“The beginning of Royal Coronation Road and main entrance to Old Town in past times. nám. Republiky 5, 110 00 Staré Město”
  • 45 moradores locais recomendam
Street Art
“Perhaps one of the city's most unlikely attractions, Prague's Lennon Wall has stood since the 1980s as a tribute to former Beatle and peace campaigner John Lennon. Things got started almost immediately after the singer's murder in 1980, when this otherwise unassuming wall near the Charles Bridge became a place for fans to demonstrate their grief, painting pictures, lyrics, and slogans attributed to the star. Despite police efforts to erase the graffiti—Czechoslovakia, as it was then, was still under communist rule—the memorial wall kept reappearing, and the site became a symbol of hope and peace for the city's population. The tradition continues to this day, and along with gatherings on the anniversary of Lennon's death, tourists can frequently be observed adding their sentiments to the wall. Address: Velkoprevorské námestí, 100 00 Praha 1”
  • 72 moradores locais recomendam
Igreja
“Situated within the grounds of Prague Castle, the Roman Catholic St. Vitus Cathedral (Katedrala St. Vita) is the Czech Republic's largest and most important Christian church. Seat of the Archbishop of Prague, it's also home to the tombs of numerous saints and three Bohemian kings. Founded on the site of a Romanesque rotunda built in AD 925, the cathedral was started in 1344 and took more than 525 years to complete, resulting in a mix of modern Neo-Gothic and 14th-century Gothic styles, along with Baroque and Renaissance influences (be sure to keep an eye out for the impressive gargoyles adorning the exterior of the cathedral). Interior highlights include stunning stained glass windows depicting the Holy Trinity, a mosaic from 1370 (The Last Judgment), and the St. Wenceslas Chapel (Svatovaclavska kaple) with its spectacular jewel-encrusted altar with more than 1,300 precious stones. Also of note, although rarely displayed, are the Czech crown jewels (on average, they're exhibited just once every eight years). Be sure to make the climb up the cathedral's 97-meter main tower for splendid views over Prague. Visitors are also welcome to attend cathedral mass. Address: III nádvorí 48/2, 119 01 Praha 1”
  • 62 moradores locais recomendam
Memorial Site
“This is a really cool monument and has a really nice walk to reach the monument. Once you arrive you will have an exceptional view of Prague and it is completely free to visit!”
  • 66 moradores locais recomendam
Ponte
“One of the most recognizable old bridges in Europe, magnificent Charles Bridge (Karluv Most) boasts 32 unique points of interest along its 621-meter span. Built in 1357, the bridge has long been the subject of a great deal of superstition, including the builders having laid the initial bridge stone on the 9th of July at exactly 5:31am, a precise set of numbers (135797531) believed to give the structure additional strength. For added good measure, it was constructed in perfect alignment with the tomb of St. Vitus and the setting sun on the equinox. The bridge is particularly famous for its many fine old statues. Among the most important are those of Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV and John of Nepomuk, the country's most revered saint, unveiled in 1683 (a more recent superstition involves rubbing the plaque at the base of the statue for the granting of a wish). Other highlights include spectacular views over the River Vltava and the structure's superb Gothic gates. Viewing Charles Bridge at night is also highly recommended (an added benefit are the smaller crowds, particularly after the spectacular sunset). Address: Karluv most, 110 00 Praha 1”
  • 39 moradores locais recomendam
Praça
“Walking across the Charles bridge from Lesser town you will reach Old town. Medieval district in Prague. The Old town square belongs also among the most visited places in Prague. ”
  • 53 moradores locais recomendam
Galeria de arte
“Spread across some of the city's most important architectural landmarks, the National Gallery in Prague (Národní galerie v Praze) is home to some of Europe's most important art collections. The bulk of the collection is housed in the Veletrzní Palace (Veletrzní Palác), a relatively modern structure built in 1925 that holds the 19th- to 21st-century works. While there's a strong emphasis on Czech artists, foreign artists such as Monet and Picasso are included, as are other art forms such as photography, fashion, applied arts, and sculpture. Other notable works are held in the Kinsky Palace (Palác Kinskych), home to Asian art, art from the ancient world, and the gallery's Baroque collections, and at the Convent of St. Agnes of Bohemia, where you'll find European art from the Middle Ages. Finally, the splendid 17th-century Sternberg Palace (Sternbersky Palác) houses some of the gallery's most famous pieces, focusing on European art from the Classical era to the end of the Baroque period and including important ancient Greek and Roman pieces; 14th- to 16th-century Italian masterpieces; and 16th- to 18th-century works by artists such as El Greco, Goya, Rubens, van Dyck, Rembrandt, and van Goyen. Address: Staromestské námestí 12, 110 15 Praha 1”
  • 13 moradores locais recomendam