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Little Havana guidebook

Julie

Little Havana guidebook

Food scene
When in Miami, trying Cuban food is a must, and there’s no better place to get it than Calle Ocho. Tucked in tiny, no-name strip malls or old-school buildings on the side of the road, Calle Ocho and its surrounding Little Havana are home to some of the best and most authentic Cuban fare around. To start, order buttered Cuban bread and a cafecito (a strong, thimble-sized cup of sweet Cuban coffee) from any “ventanita,” or Cuban coffee window. Then, move on to staples like croquetas (fried tubes stuffed with chicken, fish or ham) or rope vieja (a hearty Cuban beef stew). You’ll find restaurants everywhere you turn, but a definite must-try spot includes Versailles. On Calle Ocho, you are inundated with the sounds, smells and flavors of one of Miami’s most bustling cross-cultural neighborhoods.
Today’s Ball & Chain is a recreation of a 1930s hotspot that once occupied the same space and welcomed jazz superstars like Billie Holiday, Count Basie and Chet Baker to its stage. Across from the historic Tower Theater, the Ball & Chain has its own storied past filled with Jewish and Cuban community influences. Cuban food and festive cocktails The bar program, created by the top mixologists at the Regent Cocktail Club, is a smattering of classics (margaritas and mojitos) and new-wave drinks unique to Ball & Chain. We recommend sampling a few Cuban-inspired cocktails: the Mojito Criollo (made the classic way with the mint leaves left intact for enhanced aroma, and more sugar), the Canita (white rum, lime, house-made honey syrup, guarapo or sugarcane juice, sugarcane stick) and the Pastelito Daiquiri (pastelito-infused aged rum, lime, simple syrup, and a side of pastelitos or guava pastries). While you won't go to Ball & Chain for a full meal, the restaurant's menu of small bites make for delectable bar snacks. Order enough and you could be enjoying an incredible tapas-style dinner. The Cuban sandwich rolls are a definite crowd pleaser—think deep-fried layers of roasted pork and ham—as are the fried plantain chips. You can never eat just one. Music, then and now Who performed at Ball & Chain? The better question is, who didn't? Most of the country's greatest jazz musicians have graced the stage at Ball & Chain, from Count Bassie and Nat King Cole to Tito Puente, Jr. These days, local bands such as Spam Allstars and crooners such as the likes of Brendan O'Hara are part of the regular circuit of performers at the club's unique pineapple stage. Expect live jazz at 6pm sharp Thursday through Saturday. On Saturdays, a wild Cuban fiesta, La Pachanga, kicks off around 9pm when salsa dancers take to the bar
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Ball & Chain
1513 Southwest 8th Street
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Today’s Ball & Chain is a recreation of a 1930s hotspot that once occupied the same space and welcomed jazz superstars like Billie Holiday, Count Basie and Chet Baker to its stage. Across from the historic Tower Theater, the Ball & Chain has its own storied past filled with Jewish and Cuban community influences. Cuban food and festive cocktails The bar program, created by the top mixologists at the Regent Cocktail Club, is a smattering of classics (margaritas and mojitos) and new-wave drinks unique to Ball & Chain. We recommend sampling a few Cuban-inspired cocktails: the Mojito Criollo (made the classic way with the mint leaves left intact for enhanced aroma, and more sugar), the Canita (white rum, lime, house-made honey syrup, guarapo or sugarcane juice, sugarcane stick) and the Pastelito Daiquiri (pastelito-infused aged rum, lime, simple syrup, and a side of pastelitos or guava pastries). While you won't go to Ball & Chain for a full meal, the restaurant's menu of small bites make for delectable bar snacks. Order enough and you could be enjoying an incredible tapas-style dinner. The Cuban sandwich rolls are a definite crowd pleaser—think deep-fried layers of roasted pork and ham—as are the fried plantain chips. You can never eat just one. Music, then and now Who performed at Ball & Chain? The better question is, who didn't? Most of the country's greatest jazz musicians have graced the stage at Ball & Chain, from Count Bassie and Nat King Cole to Tito Puente, Jr. These days, local bands such as Spam Allstars and crooners such as the likes of Brendan O'Hara are part of the regular circuit of performers at the club's unique pineapple stage. Expect live jazz at 6pm sharp Thursday through Saturday. On Saturdays, a wild Cuban fiesta, La Pachanga, kicks off around 9pm when salsa dancers take to the bar
Have a sweet tooth? After dinner, swing by Azucar Ice Cream Company for a desert of homemade Cuban ice cream, featuring flavors like Café con Leche, Platano Maduro and Caramel Flan; all Cuban dessert favorites re-imagined into ice cream flavors.
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Azucar Ice Cream Company
1503 Southwest 8th Street
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Have a sweet tooth? After dinner, swing by Azucar Ice Cream Company for a desert of homemade Cuban ice cream, featuring flavors like Café con Leche, Platano Maduro and Caramel Flan; all Cuban dessert favorites re-imagined into ice cream flavors.
This Cuban chain offers large doses of the usual local nostalgia for Batista-era Cuba. You can’t miss the massive sugarcane plants growing on the front lawn. Expect large portions on the plates and a backroom café for strong Cuban coffee, sweet pastries and sugarcane juice. Though most of the ordering happens at the walk-up coffee window, serving up flaky pastelitos and espressos until the wee hours.
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La Carreta
3632 Southwest 8th Street
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This Cuban chain offers large doses of the usual local nostalgia for Batista-era Cuba. You can’t miss the massive sugarcane plants growing on the front lawn. Expect large portions on the plates and a backroom café for strong Cuban coffee, sweet pastries and sugarcane juice. Though most of the ordering happens at the walk-up coffee window, serving up flaky pastelitos and espressos until the wee hours.
Café La Trova is the delicious byproduct of a most fruitful partnership: James Beard Award-winning chef Michelle Bernstein, her chef/restaurateur husband David Martinez, and nationally acclaimed cantinero Julio Cabrera. The old-Cuba style fits right in with Little Havana’s nostalgia-tinged nightlife scene. Cabrera’s cocktail menu takes you back in time from pre-Revolutionary Cuba to present-day Miami: channel the island’s most famous mid-century expat with a Hemingway Special (rum, maraschino, grapefruit and lime), drink to Havana’s famed Hotel Nacional (rum, apricot liquor, pineapple and lime) or sip on a Yin & Tony, an updated gin & tonic with an amusing phonetic moniker. Bernstein puts her own spin on the Cuban classics, serving a Spanish-inspired Cubano with Serrano jam, empandas filled with hand-cut steak and an unbelievable paella croqueta.
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Cafe La Trova
971 SW 8th St
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Café La Trova is the delicious byproduct of a most fruitful partnership: James Beard Award-winning chef Michelle Bernstein, her chef/restaurateur husband David Martinez, and nationally acclaimed cantinero Julio Cabrera. The old-Cuba style fits right in with Little Havana’s nostalgia-tinged nightlife scene. Cabrera’s cocktail menu takes you back in time from pre-Revolutionary Cuba to present-day Miami: channel the island’s most famous mid-century expat with a Hemingway Special (rum, maraschino, grapefruit and lime), drink to Havana’s famed Hotel Nacional (rum, apricot liquor, pineapple and lime) or sip on a Yin & Tony, an updated gin & tonic with an amusing phonetic moniker. Bernstein puts her own spin on the Cuban classics, serving a Spanish-inspired Cubano with Serrano jam, empandas filled with hand-cut steak and an unbelievable paella croqueta.
Just follow the busload of tourists who frequent this casual Cuban restaurant daily. Locals dine at El Pub, too, though not as often as out-of-towners in search of an authentic Cubano in Little Havana. The rest of the menu is pretty standard to traditional Latin joints in the area—think lots of rice dishes, a variety of stews and lots of pork.
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El Pub Restaurant
1548 SW 8th St
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Just follow the busload of tourists who frequent this casual Cuban restaurant daily. Locals dine at El Pub, too, though not as often as out-of-towners in search of an authentic Cubano in Little Havana. The rest of the menu is pretty standard to traditional Latin joints in the area—think lots of rice dishes, a variety of stews and lots of pork.
Owners Eliesteban Mena and Oscar Rodriguez—who also run the nearby Old Havana Cuban Bar and Cocina—channeled famous writer Ernest Hemingway when creating their latest Calle Ocho venture, Sala’o Cuban Bar and Pescadería. Named after a character in Hemingway’s classic novel The Old Man and the Sea, Sala’o has the look and feel of a cozy-yet-opulent 1940s living room, complete with marble accents, dark wood finishes and crystal chandeliers. A famous fan of Cuba and the Florida Keys himself, Hemingway would no doubt appreciate Sala’o’s menu consisting of local, daily catch fish dishes, east coast oysters, home-style Caribbean seafood, classic Cuban cocktails and live music performed from a raised wooden stage.
Salao Cuban Bar & Pescaderia
1642 SW 8th St
Owners Eliesteban Mena and Oscar Rodriguez—who also run the nearby Old Havana Cuban Bar and Cocina—channeled famous writer Ernest Hemingway when creating their latest Calle Ocho venture, Sala’o Cuban Bar and Pescadería. Named after a character in Hemingway’s classic novel The Old Man and the Sea, Sala’o has the look and feel of a cozy-yet-opulent 1940s living room, complete with marble accents, dark wood finishes and crystal chandeliers. A famous fan of Cuba and the Florida Keys himself, Hemingway would no doubt appreciate Sala’o’s menu consisting of local, daily catch fish dishes, east coast oysters, home-style Caribbean seafood, classic Cuban cocktails and live music performed from a raised wooden stage.
Like its name suggests, Old’s Havana is a glossy tribute to the Cuba of yesteryear, complete with black-and-white photos, vintage memorabilia and a soundtrack of Cuban classics that range from rumba to boleros (and is played live on weekends). The food is slightly more contemporary, mixing in Spanish tapas and ceviche with arroz and frijoles, as are the mojitos, which can be ordered in flavors such as mango and coconut. Owners do a good job at providing a traditional Cuban experience, which, for Little Havana, means tourists are aplenty here.
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Old's Havana Cuban Bar & Cocina
1442 SW 8th St
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Like its name suggests, Old’s Havana is a glossy tribute to the Cuba of yesteryear, complete with black-and-white photos, vintage memorabilia and a soundtrack of Cuban classics that range from rumba to boleros (and is played live on weekends). The food is slightly more contemporary, mixing in Spanish tapas and ceviche with arroz and frijoles, as are the mojitos, which can be ordered in flavors such as mango and coconut. Owners do a good job at providing a traditional Cuban experience, which, for Little Havana, means tourists are aplenty here.
Everyone loves a good comeback story, especially if it’s the return of one of Miami’s most beloved doughnut shops. Velvet Crème—which had a Little Havana store that shuttered in 2000 after more than 50 years in business—returned to Calle Ocho after a brief stint as a food truck. Its classic red-and-white decor has undergone slight updates, but its menu picks up right where the original left off: with classic glazed doughnuts, soft-serve ice cream and fresh-brewed coffee.
3dough5
1555 SW 8th St
Everyone loves a good comeback story, especially if it’s the return of one of Miami’s most beloved doughnut shops. Velvet Crème—which had a Little Havana store that shuttered in 2000 after more than 50 years in business—returned to Calle Ocho after a brief stint as a food truck. Its classic red-and-white decor has undergone slight updates, but its menu picks up right where the original left off: with classic glazed doughnuts, soft-serve ice cream and fresh-brewed coffee.
Little Havana's only true beer bar is the brainchild of David and Cici Rodriguez, owners of the Miami Brew Bus and cofounders of Kush Wynwood. The duo's experience helming beer-centric businesses is evident in the Calle Ocho establishment, featuring rotating taps (check out the chalkboard menu to see what's new) and double coolers filled with cans and bottles of local, American-made and internationally brewed varieties. To order, grab your favorite and give it to the bartender to ring up—simple as that. Union Beer also has vintage arcade games to keep you busy between sips.
The Union Beer Store
1547 SW 8th St
Little Havana's only true beer bar is the brainchild of David and Cici Rodriguez, owners of the Miami Brew Bus and cofounders of Kush Wynwood. The duo's experience helming beer-centric businesses is evident in the Calle Ocho establishment, featuring rotating taps (check out the chalkboard menu to see what's new) and double coolers filled with cans and bottles of local, American-made and internationally brewed varieties. To order, grab your favorite and give it to the bartender to ring up—simple as that. Union Beer also has vintage arcade games to keep you busy between sips.
If you are ready, both emotionally and physically, for one hell of a dining experience Lung Yai is your place. This hidden Little Havana gem is run by Chef Bas, who can be equal parts intimidating and insanely hospitable. With the chef's help, Lung Yai serves up some of the city’s best Thai food. Period. And it’s open on weekends until 2am. There are some rules to follow. You are to wait patiently for a table after signing your name on a list outside the door. Don’t loiter in the restaurant or waltz up to the bar to order a beer. But once you are seated, just go crazy. Everything is delicious.
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Lung Yai Thai Tapas
1731 SW 8th St
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If you are ready, both emotionally and physically, for one hell of a dining experience Lung Yai is your place. This hidden Little Havana gem is run by Chef Bas, who can be equal parts intimidating and insanely hospitable. With the chef's help, Lung Yai serves up some of the city’s best Thai food. Period. And it’s open on weekends until 2am. There are some rules to follow. You are to wait patiently for a table after signing your name on a list outside the door. Don’t loiter in the restaurant or waltz up to the bar to order a beer. But once you are seated, just go crazy. Everything is delicious.
Little Havana’s charming seafood shack will make you crave bivalves the next time you’re in the ’hood. The Miami-style New England–inspired eatery (got that?) offers six varieties of East, West and Gulf Coast oysters daily. From Prince Edward Island’s Cooke’s Cove Malpeque to Florida’s Apalachicola Bay, the day’s selection is written on the chalkboard menu. Plus, Ella’s raw bar is stocked with seasonal favorites like stone crab claws, local fish ceviche and fresh starters, like taquitos and tostadas. For a taste of the neighborhood, try the calle lobster roll on a toasted medianoche roll or the surf ’n’ turf frita Cubana, featuring a chorizo patty topped with lump crab meat and Ella’s special sauce.
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Ellas Oyster Bar
1615 SW 8th St
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Little Havana’s charming seafood shack will make you crave bivalves the next time you’re in the ’hood. The Miami-style New England–inspired eatery (got that?) offers six varieties of East, West and Gulf Coast oysters daily. From Prince Edward Island’s Cooke’s Cove Malpeque to Florida’s Apalachicola Bay, the day’s selection is written on the chalkboard menu. Plus, Ella’s raw bar is stocked with seasonal favorites like stone crab claws, local fish ceviche and fresh starters, like taquitos and tostadas. For a taste of the neighborhood, try the calle lobster roll on a toasted medianoche roll or the surf ’n’ turf frita Cubana, featuring a chorizo patty topped with lump crab meat and Ella’s special sauce.
Versailles Restaurant (commonly referred to as simply Versailles) is a landmark eating establishment which seats 370 people and has ornate etched glass and statuettes and features a bakery, a takeout area, a counter window and the ability to host banquets and parties. Founded by Felipe A. Valls, Sr. from Santiago de Cuba in 1971, Versailles is a popular restaurant among local Cuban exiles and tourists for its Cuban cuisine and connection to anti-Castro politics, serving "cafecito", "cortadito", Cuban pastries (beef or guava), and "croquetas" at the walk-up window. In its main dining room, the restaurant also serves dishes including Moros, palomilla steaks (Cuban minute steak), maduros, tasajo, croquetas de yuca, tamal en cazuela, and milanesa. During Fidel Castro's hospitalization in August 2006, the news media set up a small tent city outside the restaurant in case news would break from the location. Cuban-American politicians, including those from out-of-state like New Jersey Senator Robert Menendez, often hold fundraisers and rallies at the restaurant. Revelers celebrated for hours in front of Versailles when Fidel Castro's death was announced in the early morning hours of November 26, 2016.
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Versailles Restaurant Cuban Cuisine
3555 SW 8th St
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Versailles Restaurant (commonly referred to as simply Versailles) is a landmark eating establishment which seats 370 people and has ornate etched glass and statuettes and features a bakery, a takeout area, a counter window and the ability to host banquets and parties. Founded by Felipe A. Valls, Sr. from Santiago de Cuba in 1971, Versailles is a popular restaurant among local Cuban exiles and tourists for its Cuban cuisine and connection to anti-Castro politics, serving "cafecito", "cortadito", Cuban pastries (beef or guava), and "croquetas" at the walk-up window. In its main dining room, the restaurant also serves dishes including Moros, palomilla steaks (Cuban minute steak), maduros, tasajo, croquetas de yuca, tamal en cazuela, and milanesa. During Fidel Castro's hospitalization in August 2006, the news media set up a small tent city outside the restaurant in case news would break from the location. Cuban-American politicians, including those from out-of-state like New Jersey Senator Robert Menendez, often hold fundraisers and rallies at the restaurant. Revelers celebrated for hours in front of Versailles when Fidel Castro's death was announced in the early morning hours of November 26, 2016.
Sightseeing
Calle Ocho is the center of Cuban life and culture in Miami’s Little Havana neighborhood. This vibrant street is known for its Cuban restaurants, popular ventanitas, Cuban bakeries and colorful street festivals. The best way to familiarize yourself with the area is through a guided walking tour. Corrina Moebius leads a variety of tours, including the three-hour Cuban/Latino Traditions & Arts of Calle Ocho Tour. A true ambassador of the neighborhood, her community involvement and local expertise will make you feel at home amongst the residents and business owners, and eager to explore more for yourself at the conclusion of her tour. You’ll sample Cuban food, learn about a variety of musical traditions, explore art galleries and studios, and gain insight into the art of cigar rolling.
Take a walk down Calle Ocho, right into Maximo Gomez Park a.k.a. Domino Park. Located on the corner of Calle Ocho and 15th Avenue, this local spot was named after a famous soldier, Maximo Gomez, who fought for Cuban independence from Spain. A quintessential hangout for Cuban veterans, families and more, this is where you find the real Little Havana locals smoking Cuban cigars or talking about the latest headlines, all over a game of dominoes. A tradition for over 35 years, the game-play at the Park is serious and exciting to watch. The small park features walkways with domino-decorated tile-work, with a perimeter lined with benches for spectators. The park is located on the corner of SW 8th Street (Calle Ocho), and 15th Avenue, and is open from 9 am - 6 pm daily. Also, Just around the corner from Domino Park is the Little Havana "Paseo de las Estrellas" (Walk of the Stars). It is reminiscent of the walk of stars in Hollywood, except that here, stars are given to Latin American actors, writers, artists and musicians.
Dominos park
801 SW 15th Ave
Take a walk down Calle Ocho, right into Maximo Gomez Park a.k.a. Domino Park. Located on the corner of Calle Ocho and 15th Avenue, this local spot was named after a famous soldier, Maximo Gomez, who fought for Cuban independence from Spain. A quintessential hangout for Cuban veterans, families and more, this is where you find the real Little Havana locals smoking Cuban cigars or talking about the latest headlines, all over a game of dominoes. A tradition for over 35 years, the game-play at the Park is serious and exciting to watch. The small park features walkways with domino-decorated tile-work, with a perimeter lined with benches for spectators. The park is located on the corner of SW 8th Street (Calle Ocho), and 15th Avenue, and is open from 9 am - 6 pm daily. Also, Just around the corner from Domino Park is the Little Havana "Paseo de las Estrellas" (Walk of the Stars). It is reminiscent of the walk of stars in Hollywood, except that here, stars are given to Latin American actors, writers, artists and musicians.
Built in 1926, this was the only movie theater in Miami to show English-language films with Spanish subtitles. Located next to Domino Park, the theater was once a gathering spot for Cuban immigrants who went to watch Spanish movies with English subtitles to learn English. Today, this Art Deco-style building is owned by Miami-Dade College and is now a hotspot for cultural events and one of the few local theaters with a regular rotation of foreign language films, new films from Cuba and other Latin American countries, as well as shorts and features by budding Miami cineastes. The Tower Theater hosts a series of educational presentations sponsored by the college, like alternative Cuban exhibitions and performances, free educational lectures by Miami-Dade College faculty and both Spanish-and English-language films.
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Tower Theater
1508 Southwest 8th Street
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Built in 1926, this was the only movie theater in Miami to show English-language films with Spanish subtitles. Located next to Domino Park, the theater was once a gathering spot for Cuban immigrants who went to watch Spanish movies with English subtitles to learn English. Today, this Art Deco-style building is owned by Miami-Dade College and is now a hotspot for cultural events and one of the few local theaters with a regular rotation of foreign language films, new films from Cuba and other Latin American countries, as well as shorts and features by budding Miami cineastes. The Tower Theater hosts a series of educational presentations sponsored by the college, like alternative Cuban exhibitions and performances, free educational lectures by Miami-Dade College faculty and both Spanish-and English-language films.
Located on Calle Ocho, Cuban Memorial Boulevard pays homage to Cuban soldiers who fought in the 1961 Bay of Pigs Invasion and the Cuban War of Independence. You’ll find a string of seven small monuments scattered throughout this stretch of road, including those honoring Cuban independence fighter Antonio Maceo Grajales and anti-communist crusader Tony Izquierdo. Additionally, check out the statues of the Virgin Mary and a 16-foot raised map of the island of Cuba with an inscription by patriot José Martí that reads, "La patria es agonia y deber,” which ttranslates to “The homeland is agony and duty."
Cuban Memorial Boulevard Park
999 SW 13th Ave
Located on Calle Ocho, Cuban Memorial Boulevard pays homage to Cuban soldiers who fought in the 1961 Bay of Pigs Invasion and the Cuban War of Independence. You’ll find a string of seven small monuments scattered throughout this stretch of road, including those honoring Cuban independence fighter Antonio Maceo Grajales and anti-communist crusader Tony Izquierdo. Additionally, check out the statues of the Virgin Mary and a 16-foot raised map of the island of Cuba with an inscription by patriot José Martí that reads, "La patria es agonia y deber,” which ttranslates to “The homeland is agony and duty."
Next to Domino Park you’ll find Tower Theater, a historic movie theater, built in 1926, known for being a gathering spot where Cuban immigrants once went to watch Spanish movies with English subtitles to learn English. Today, this Art Deco-style building is owned by Miami-Dade College. A hotspot for cultural events, the Tower Theater hosts a series of educational presentations sponsored by the college, like alternative Cuban exhibitions and performances, free educational lectures by Miami-Dade College faculty and both Spanish-and English-language films.
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Tower Theater
1508 Southwest 8th Street
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Next to Domino Park you’ll find Tower Theater, a historic movie theater, built in 1926, known for being a gathering spot where Cuban immigrants once went to watch Spanish movies with English subtitles to learn English. Today, this Art Deco-style building is owned by Miami-Dade College. A hotspot for cultural events, the Tower Theater hosts a series of educational presentations sponsored by the college, like alternative Cuban exhibitions and performances, free educational lectures by Miami-Dade College faculty and both Spanish-and English-language films.
On Calle Ocho life is always a celebration. Taking place the last Friday of every month from 7 to 11 p.m., Viernes Culturales, or “Cultural Fridays,” is a monthly event celebrating the best of Cuban arts, culture and music. See and experience countless cultural art exhibits, music, poetry, theater, film, dancing in the streets, domino games and historic neighborhood tours. Another popular festival, Carnival on Calle Ocho, is the largest Hispanic street festival and block party in the southeastern United States. Locally called “El Festival de la Calle Ocho,” this annual event attracts over a million attendees and celebrates Hispanic culture at its finest. From street performers and eight stages with live Latin music, to salsa, conga lines, good Latin food, and treats from local vendors dotted throughout, Carnival on Calle Ocho is just one more reason to celebrate in Little Havana.
Carnaval Miami
1400 SW 1st St
On Calle Ocho life is always a celebration. Taking place the last Friday of every month from 7 to 11 p.m., Viernes Culturales, or “Cultural Fridays,” is a monthly event celebrating the best of Cuban arts, culture and music. See and experience countless cultural art exhibits, music, poetry, theater, film, dancing in the streets, domino games and historic neighborhood tours. Another popular festival, Carnival on Calle Ocho, is the largest Hispanic street festival and block party in the southeastern United States. Locally called “El Festival de la Calle Ocho,” this annual event attracts over a million attendees and celebrates Hispanic culture at its finest. From street performers and eight stages with live Latin music, to salsa, conga lines, good Latin food, and treats from local vendors dotted throughout, Carnival on Calle Ocho is just one more reason to celebrate in Little Havana.
As you walk up and down SW 8th Street (between SW 17th and SW 12th Avenues), you’ll notice that the sidewalk is marked with pink marble stars, making up the Calle Ocho Walk of Fame. This Little Havana version of the Hollywood attraction began as a way to recognize Cuban celebrities. Cuba’s most famous salsa singer, Celia Cruz, who died in 2003, was the first to be immortalized in 1987, and since then singers and soap stars from all over Latin America have been honored.
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Calle Ocho Walk of Fame
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As you walk up and down SW 8th Street (between SW 17th and SW 12th Avenues), you’ll notice that the sidewalk is marked with pink marble stars, making up the Calle Ocho Walk of Fame. This Little Havana version of the Hollywood attraction began as a way to recognize Cuban celebrities. Cuba’s most famous salsa singer, Celia Cruz, who died in 2003, was the first to be immortalized in 1987, and since then singers and soap stars from all over Latin America have been honored.
Every third Friday of the month at Domino Plaza (Calle 8, between 13th and 17th avenue) Viernes Culturales , Miami’s popular art and culture festival in Little Havana is fun for the whole family! Children’s Village, art, music, dancing, and more! Enjoy and amazing evening in Little Havana! Free trolley service from Mary Brickell Village and Brickell Metrorail Station, every 15 minutes starting at 6:30 pm In 2019: June 21, July 19, August 16, September 20, October 18, November 15 and December 20
Viernes Culturales Cultural
1637 SW 8th St
Every third Friday of the month at Domino Plaza (Calle 8, between 13th and 17th avenue) Viernes Culturales , Miami’s popular art and culture festival in Little Havana is fun for the whole family! Children’s Village, art, music, dancing, and more! Enjoy and amazing evening in Little Havana! Free trolley service from Mary Brickell Village and Brickell Metrorail Station, every 15 minutes starting at 6:30 pm In 2019: June 21, July 19, August 16, September 20, October 18, November 15 and December 20
Part gallery, workspace and studio, Futurama showcases mostly works by Cuban artists, many of whom have been hand-selected for temporary residency. The six-year-old space opens to the public on weekdays and on the last Friday night of the month for Viernes Culturales, Little Havana's popular gallery walk.
Futurama Building
1637 SW 8th St
Part gallery, workspace and studio, Futurama showcases mostly works by Cuban artists, many of whom have been hand-selected for temporary residency. The six-year-old space opens to the public on weekdays and on the last Friday night of the month for Viernes Culturales, Little Havana's popular gallery walk.
During the day, this sliver of a space along Calle Ocho operates as Agustín Gaínza's personal studio and exhibit space. But on weekend nights, the gallery transforms into a lively wine bar and restaurant run by the artist and his wife. La Taberna del Pintor, the artist's tavern, is a homey place to sip a glass of wine, nibble on charcuterie, listen to live music and get to know more about Cuba's artistic ex-pats. All of Gaínza's paintings hanging on the wall are for sale and well worth the splurge.
Agustin Gainza Arts And Tavern
1652 Southwest 8th Street
During the day, this sliver of a space along Calle Ocho operates as Agustín Gaínza's personal studio and exhibit space. But on weekend nights, the gallery transforms into a lively wine bar and restaurant run by the artist and his wife. La Taberna del Pintor, the artist's tavern, is a homey place to sip a glass of wine, nibble on charcuterie, listen to live music and get to know more about Cuba's artistic ex-pats. All of Gaínza's paintings hanging on the wall are for sale and well worth the splurge.
Shows at this elegant 839-seat theater range from the Miami Lyric Opera to Latin stars, such as Maria Creuza, the Brazilian bossa nova diva, and José González, the Swedish-Argentinian folkie. A few blocks south of Calle Ocho, address is 900 SW 1st St, Miami
Manuel Artime Theater
900 SW 1st St
Shows at this elegant 839-seat theater range from the Miami Lyric Opera to Latin stars, such as Maria Creuza, the Brazilian bossa nova diva, and José González, the Swedish-Argentinian folkie. A few blocks south of Calle Ocho, address is 900 SW 1st St, Miami
Shopping
You can’t go to Calle Ocho, the hub of Cuban culture, and not try a Cuban cigar. Walk along Little Havana’s most popular street, and you’ll find a range of family owned cigar shops that double as local hangouts.
Some of the more popular shops include El Titan de Bronze and Cuban Crafters, but walk into any you find and you’ll see age-old cigar aficionados rolling cigars just like their fathers and grandfathers taught them in Cuba. To make sure every cigar is perfect, each roller focuses on one type only, of which they are considered masters of their craft.
El Titan de Bronze
1071 SW 8th St
Some of the more popular shops include El Titan de Bronze and Cuban Crafters, but walk into any you find and you’ll see age-old cigar aficionados rolling cigars just like their fathers and grandfathers taught them in Cuba. To make sure every cigar is perfect, each roller focuses on one type only, of which they are considered masters of their craft.
One of the more popular Cuban Cigar shops where you’ll see age-old cigar aficionados rolling cigars just like their fathers and grandfathers taught them in Cuba. To make sure every cigar is perfect, each roller focuses on one type only, of which they are considered masters of their craft.
Cuban Crafters Cigars
3604 NW 7th St
One of the more popular Cuban Cigar shops where you’ll see age-old cigar aficionados rolling cigars just like their fathers and grandfathers taught them in Cuba. To make sure every cigar is perfect, each roller focuses on one type only, of which they are considered masters of their craft.