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Karolina’s guidebook

Karolina

Karolina’s guidebook

Historic sites
The workhouse museum is very interesting an a worthwhile visit to see what life was like. The workhouse was an institution which operated in Ireland for a period of some 80 years, from the early 1840s to the early 1920s. There were 163 workhouses in total. If people could not support themselves, they could come into the workhouse. Here they would do some work in return for food. People had to stay and live in the workhouse and so the system was known as indoor relief. You get a guided tour by knowledgeable guides who make this an educational yet fun experience. There's tea and coffee and a ten min video, it is definitely a worthwhile visit.
Irish Workhouse Centre
The workhouse museum is very interesting an a worthwhile visit to see what life was like. The workhouse was an institution which operated in Ireland for a period of some 80 years, from the early 1840s to the early 1920s. There were 163 workhouses in total. If people could not support themselves, they could come into the workhouse. Here they would do some work in return for food. People had to stay and live in the workhouse and so the system was known as indoor relief. You get a guided tour by knowledgeable guides who make this an educational yet fun experience. There's tea and coffee and a ten min video, it is definitely a worthwhile visit.
For an experience like no other come to WB Yeats’s hallowed tower at Thoor Ballylee, Galway. Come and visit the Hiberno-Norman tower, with its fourteenth century stones and intimate living spaces so closely associated with the poet WB Yeats. Walk the narrow bridge and crossing stones, admire the gardens and river, view Yeats’s pear trees, one ‘broken by a storm’ as in his poem ‘Meditations in Time of Civil War’, and now, once again, enter into the sacred ground of tower and cottage. There you can climb the famous winding stair, stride the battlements and view the countryside, experience our immersive exhibitions exploring the poet’s art, his connection with the west, and his life and loves, attend our cultural events programme, shop for books and momentos, and take a cup of tea by our roaring fire.
Thoor Ballylee
For an experience like no other come to WB Yeats’s hallowed tower at Thoor Ballylee, Galway. Come and visit the Hiberno-Norman tower, with its fourteenth century stones and intimate living spaces so closely associated with the poet WB Yeats. Walk the narrow bridge and crossing stones, admire the gardens and river, view Yeats’s pear trees, one ‘broken by a storm’ as in his poem ‘Meditations in Time of Civil War’, and now, once again, enter into the sacred ground of tower and cottage. There you can climb the famous winding stair, stride the battlements and view the countryside, experience our immersive exhibitions exploring the poet’s art, his connection with the west, and his life and loves, attend our cultural events programme, shop for books and momentos, and take a cup of tea by our roaring fire.
Neighbourhoods
Galway has been designated the European Capital of Culture 2020. Known as the City of the Tribes, Galway is the gateway to the Wild Atlantic Way along Ireland’s western seaboard. Galway celebrates the International Arts Festival which is filled with history, music, arts and culture ready for you to discover. In the town, its famous Spanish Arch is next to the Galway City Museum, one of the most popular free attractions in Ireland. With three floors dedicated to archaeology, history and sea science, it’s the perfect place to begin your exploration of Galway’s past. Nearby is the free-entry Hall of the Red Earl, a fascinating archaeological site in the heart of Galway City, close to the iconic Druid Theatre. Within the same vicinity is the Claddagh Ring Museum, where visitors can learn about the world famous Claddagh ring, a beloved symbol of the city. Popular as a wedding ring, the band features a crown for loyalty, hands for friendship and a heart for love. A short walk away is the Claddagh itself, a former fishing village where the ring was first made in the 17th century. Afterwards, a visit to Quay Street, where you can purchase your own claddagh ring, listen to street musicians, dine in local restaurants and shop in quirky independent stores like vintage haven Twice as Nice or traditional toy store Wooden Heart is a must. You can also indulge in a beverage in one of Galway’s best-known bars, Tigh Neachtain, or the Quays pub. Or if you venture further up town to the Treasure Chest, this is where as young kid Ed Sheeran played a tune or two. Outside Galway City, there is even more to explore. Located just off the coast of Galway are the Irish-speaking Aran Islands. The largest of the three islands, Inis Mór, has been described as 'one of the world’s top island destinations' by National Geographic. Connemara National Park covers almost 3,000 hectares of mountains, bogs and woodlands, all ripe for exploring is a must see, even on wet and wild day it beauty is stunning. Nearby is Kylemore Abbey rich history - the 19th century Abbey has been home to Benedictine Nuns since 1920, having been forced to flee Belgium during World War I. Now the Abbey and Victorian Walled Garden provide a stunning backdrop while visitors enjoy a bite to eat in this truly exceptional setting.
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moradores locais recomendam
Galway City
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moradores locais recomendam
Galway has been designated the European Capital of Culture 2020. Known as the City of the Tribes, Galway is the gateway to the Wild Atlantic Way along Ireland’s western seaboard. Galway celebrates the International Arts Festival which is filled with history, music, arts and culture ready for you to discover. In the town, its famous Spanish Arch is next to the Galway City Museum, one of the most popular free attractions in Ireland. With three floors dedicated to archaeology, history and sea science, it’s the perfect place to begin your exploration of Galway’s past. Nearby is the free-entry Hall of the Red Earl, a fascinating archaeological site in the heart of Galway City, close to the iconic Druid Theatre. Within the same vicinity is the Claddagh Ring Museum, where visitors can learn about the world famous Claddagh ring, a beloved symbol of the city. Popular as a wedding ring, the band features a crown for loyalty, hands for friendship and a heart for love. A short walk away is the Claddagh itself, a former fishing village where the ring was first made in the 17th century. Afterwards, a visit to Quay Street, where you can purchase your own claddagh ring, listen to street musicians, dine in local restaurants and shop in quirky independent stores like vintage haven Twice as Nice or traditional toy store Wooden Heart is a must. You can also indulge in a beverage in one of Galway’s best-known bars, Tigh Neachtain, or the Quays pub. Or if you venture further up town to the Treasure Chest, this is where as young kid Ed Sheeran played a tune or two. Outside Galway City, there is even more to explore. Located just off the coast of Galway are the Irish-speaking Aran Islands. The largest of the three islands, Inis Mór, has been described as 'one of the world’s top island destinations' by National Geographic. Connemara National Park covers almost 3,000 hectares of mountains, bogs and woodlands, all ripe for exploring is a must see, even on wet and wild day it beauty is stunning. Nearby is Kylemore Abbey rich history - the 19th century Abbey has been home to Benedictine Nuns since 1920, having been forced to flee Belgium during World War I. Now the Abbey and Victorian Walled Garden provide a stunning backdrop while visitors enjoy a bite to eat in this truly exceptional setting.