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Průvodce uživatele Veronika

Veronika

Průvodce uživatele Veronika

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This is Ota Pavel’s country: "A bank ascends above the river by the island, a strange bank as the usual rocks are absent. But there is soft greenery on the small plateaus among the massive oaks. Game used to come here to graze and pass by here when going to the river to drink. In fact it was a beautiful garden or a chateau park...." The writer Ota Pavel described with these words the Křivoklátsko countryside in one of his famous stories - Smrt Krásných Srnců (The Death of the Beautiful Roebucks). Křivoklátsko, a PLA and UNESCO biosphere reserve, is unusual in comparison to similar landscapes in Europe. It is spread out in Central Bohemia and is covered by deciduous and mixed forests (up to two thirds of the area). More than 1800 species of vascular plants and at least 52 woody species have been conserved here to this day. It serves as a breeding ground for about 120 bird species and numerous species of animals, one of which is on the Red list of rare and vulnerable species. The richness and preservation of the whole area are the result of many natural elements and the historical context, most importantly the broken country of the Křivoklátská uplands, rich geological constitution, the phenomenon of the Berounka River valley, varied orientation of biotopes towards cardinal points, soil types, climatic conditions and also past development of settlements. The steep and inaccessible slopes of the Berounka River valley are covered with indigenous forest woody species and there are outcrops with typical thermophilous fauna and flora species in some parts. The water flow has created a deep, , valley in the rock basement for thousands of years, even forming a canyon in some parts. Due to the river there is a quite temperate mesoclimate. In contrast, the Berounka water-sources form narrow valleys where sunlight barely reaches the bottom, especially in summer, when it is shaded by the canopy of the deciduous trees is. The temperature on the bottom of the valleys is rather low for most of the year, which corresponds to conditions in foothills and mountainous areas. Temperature inversion, which is typical for this area, is one of the sources of rich biodiversity here.
Křivoklát
This is Ota Pavel’s country: "A bank ascends above the river by the island, a strange bank as the usual rocks are absent. But there is soft greenery on the small plateaus among the massive oaks. Game used to come here to graze and pass by here when going to the river to drink. In fact it was a beautiful garden or a chateau park...." The writer Ota Pavel described with these words the Křivoklátsko countryside in one of his famous stories - Smrt Krásných Srnců (The Death of the Beautiful Roebucks). Křivoklátsko, a PLA and UNESCO biosphere reserve, is unusual in comparison to similar landscapes in Europe. It is spread out in Central Bohemia and is covered by deciduous and mixed forests (up to two thirds of the area). More than 1800 species of vascular plants and at least 52 woody species have been conserved here to this day. It serves as a breeding ground for about 120 bird species and numerous species of animals, one of which is on the Red list of rare and vulnerable species. The richness and preservation of the whole area are the result of many natural elements and the historical context, most importantly the broken country of the Křivoklátská uplands, rich geological constitution, the phenomenon of the Berounka River valley, varied orientation of biotopes towards cardinal points, soil types, climatic conditions and also past development of settlements. The steep and inaccessible slopes of the Berounka River valley are covered with indigenous forest woody species and there are outcrops with typical thermophilous fauna and flora species in some parts. The water flow has created a deep, , valley in the rock basement for thousands of years, even forming a canyon in some parts. Due to the river there is a quite temperate mesoclimate. In contrast, the Berounka water-sources form narrow valleys where sunlight barely reaches the bottom, especially in summer, when it is shaded by the canopy of the deciduous trees is. The temperature on the bottom of the valleys is rather low for most of the year, which corresponds to conditions in foothills and mountainous areas. Temperature inversion, which is typical for this area, is one of the sources of rich biodiversity here.
Karlštejn Castle was founded in 1348 by the Charles IV, King of Bohemia and Holy Roman Emperor as his private residence and a place of safekeeping royal treasures, especially his collections of holy relics and the Imperial Crown Jewels. In 1355 Charles IV stayed here for the first time, overseeing the construction and decoration work, especially in chapels. The construction was completed in 1365 when the Chapel of the Holy Cross in the Great Tower was consecrated. The Chapel of the Holy Cross was the place of safekeeping the imperial crown jewels until 1420 when the Hussite wars (religious civil war) began, and they had not ever returned to Karlštejn Castle. After the wars in 1436, the Bohemian crown jewels were taken to the Chapel of the Holy Cross where they remained till 1619. The castle was a representative residence of Charles IV and his son Wenceslas IV only, i.e. till 1419. As a fortress, Karlštejn Castle protected the crown jewels, holy relics, and royal archives till the 17th century. Over the centuries the castle has always been in hands of the king or a state institution, never in private hands. Nowadays it is owned by the state. After 1480 the castle was rebuilt in the late Gothic style, in the last quarter of the 16th century in the Renaissance style. During the last reconstruction that took place at the end of the 19th century (by architect Josef Mocker) in the spirit of purism, the castle gained its present appearance. Very impressive is the preserved original stair-arrangement of individual castle buildings. The lower section with a small courtyard by the Well Tower and the Burgrave´s House continue through the majestic five-storey Imperial Palace and the Marian Tower. At the highest point, the construction of the castle culminates in a monumental, 60-meter-high Great Tower and its massive fortifications. Castle Attractions A unique original 14th-century wall decoration, a set of 129 paintings created by Master Theodoric in the Chapel of the Holy Cross (the largest in the world), the largest portrait gallery of kings of Bohemia in the Czech Republic, a replica of the royal Crown of Bohemia, a unique castle well. The castle is also famous as a set to a comedy play Night at Karlštejn Castle by Czech poet Jaroslav Vrchlický.
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Karlštejn
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Karlštejn Castle was founded in 1348 by the Charles IV, King of Bohemia and Holy Roman Emperor as his private residence and a place of safekeeping royal treasures, especially his collections of holy relics and the Imperial Crown Jewels. In 1355 Charles IV stayed here for the first time, overseeing the construction and decoration work, especially in chapels. The construction was completed in 1365 when the Chapel of the Holy Cross in the Great Tower was consecrated. The Chapel of the Holy Cross was the place of safekeeping the imperial crown jewels until 1420 when the Hussite wars (religious civil war) began, and they had not ever returned to Karlštejn Castle. After the wars in 1436, the Bohemian crown jewels were taken to the Chapel of the Holy Cross where they remained till 1619. The castle was a representative residence of Charles IV and his son Wenceslas IV only, i.e. till 1419. As a fortress, Karlštejn Castle protected the crown jewels, holy relics, and royal archives till the 17th century. Over the centuries the castle has always been in hands of the king or a state institution, never in private hands. Nowadays it is owned by the state. After 1480 the castle was rebuilt in the late Gothic style, in the last quarter of the 16th century in the Renaissance style. During the last reconstruction that took place at the end of the 19th century (by architect Josef Mocker) in the spirit of purism, the castle gained its present appearance. Very impressive is the preserved original stair-arrangement of individual castle buildings. The lower section with a small courtyard by the Well Tower and the Burgrave´s House continue through the majestic five-storey Imperial Palace and the Marian Tower. At the highest point, the construction of the castle culminates in a monumental, 60-meter-high Great Tower and its massive fortifications. Castle Attractions A unique original 14th-century wall decoration, a set of 129 paintings created by Master Theodoric in the Chapel of the Holy Cross (the largest in the world), the largest portrait gallery of kings of Bohemia in the Czech Republic, a replica of the royal Crown of Bohemia, a unique castle well. The castle is also famous as a set to a comedy play Night at Karlštejn Castle by Czech poet Jaroslav Vrchlický.
The Baroque chateau in the village of Lany in the midst of the Krivoklat woods, not far from Prague, is the official summer residence of the presidents of the Czech Republic. History The earliest mention in records about Lany date from 1392. In those days there was a wooden keep here. At the end of the 16th century Rudolf II bought the village and had the original citadel replaced with a simple hunting lodge in the Renaissance style which in the course of the 17th century took on a Baroque character. The Wallensteins bought the Chateau at the end of the 17th century. In 1730, Count Jan Josef Wallenstein had another floor added to the small Chateau at Lany. As of the beginning of the 18th century Lany was in the hands of the Fürstenbergs, notably until 1921 when the Czechoslovak state bought the Chateau as a prestigious seat for the Head of State. The area underwent countless reconstruction projects and its present-day image is the result of a renovation operation which took place in 1902 - 1903. Architect Josip Plecnik undertook the most recent reconstruction of the Chateau and its surroundings in 1921-24. The Chateau is situated on the axis of the Chateau Park and constitutes its organic dominant feature. The Chateau Park The extensive Chateau Park was established in 1770. Its present-day image was influenced by the modifications introduced by J. Plecnik. A lake was created as part of the park and later also greenhouses were erected. The Lany Game Park A game park, which was established by the Wallensteins back in 1713, is situated beyond the actual park. Today it belongs to the environmentally protected area of the Krivoklat region. The game park is fenced in and is not open to the public. It contains a so-called "Agreement Oak" at which the Little Entente was signed in 1922. About 2 km from the Chateau there is a villa called Amelia in which government meetings are held. Currently the game park extends over an area of some 3,000 hectares and serves in particular to protect pure-bred game (deer, fallow deer, mouflons and sika deer). The idea of arranging hunts for distinguished guests was also one of the reasons why Lany was chosen in 1921 as a country seat for the Head of the Czechoslovak State. Tomas Garrigue Masaryk The first President of Czechoslovakia, Tomas Garrigue Masaryk became very fond of Lany Chateau. Following his abdication in 1935, he was permitted to move to Lany with his family permanently. In the end he chose Lany as his last place of rest for himself and his family. The grave of the Masaryk family has become a symbol of Czechoslovak democracy, especially in the times of a totalitarian regime. Following the death of T.G. Masaryk, the Lany Chateau was utilized sporadically. During World War II, State President Dr. Emil Hacha resided in Lany. Only Vaclav Havel in his office as President began to visit Lany on a regular basis once again. You can reach Lany from Prague by taking the road in the direction of Karlovy Vary (distance about 35 km). The first President of the Czechoslovak Republic Tomas G. Masaryk and his family are buried in the Lany cemetery. Regular services are held in the church Name of Jesus, adjacent to the Chateau: on Thursdays and Saturdays at 5 p m., in winter at 4 p.m., on Sundays at 3 p.m. The park is open to visitors (open to the public since 1990): Wednesday and Thursday from 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday, Sunday and holidays from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. each year in the period from the Saturday before Easter until November 2 and on the day of the birth and on the day of the death of the president T. G. Masaryk (March 7 and September 14 - the Park is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.). The Chateau is not usually open to the public (on March 7, 2000 the Chateau was opened to the public for the first time).
Lány
The Baroque chateau in the village of Lany in the midst of the Krivoklat woods, not far from Prague, is the official summer residence of the presidents of the Czech Republic. History The earliest mention in records about Lany date from 1392. In those days there was a wooden keep here. At the end of the 16th century Rudolf II bought the village and had the original citadel replaced with a simple hunting lodge in the Renaissance style which in the course of the 17th century took on a Baroque character. The Wallensteins bought the Chateau at the end of the 17th century. In 1730, Count Jan Josef Wallenstein had another floor added to the small Chateau at Lany. As of the beginning of the 18th century Lany was in the hands of the Fürstenbergs, notably until 1921 when the Czechoslovak state bought the Chateau as a prestigious seat for the Head of State. The area underwent countless reconstruction projects and its present-day image is the result of a renovation operation which took place in 1902 - 1903. Architect Josip Plecnik undertook the most recent reconstruction of the Chateau and its surroundings in 1921-24. The Chateau is situated on the axis of the Chateau Park and constitutes its organic dominant feature. The Chateau Park The extensive Chateau Park was established in 1770. Its present-day image was influenced by the modifications introduced by J. Plecnik. A lake was created as part of the park and later also greenhouses were erected. The Lany Game Park A game park, which was established by the Wallensteins back in 1713, is situated beyond the actual park. Today it belongs to the environmentally protected area of the Krivoklat region. The game park is fenced in and is not open to the public. It contains a so-called "Agreement Oak" at which the Little Entente was signed in 1922. About 2 km from the Chateau there is a villa called Amelia in which government meetings are held. Currently the game park extends over an area of some 3,000 hectares and serves in particular to protect pure-bred game (deer, fallow deer, mouflons and sika deer). The idea of arranging hunts for distinguished guests was also one of the reasons why Lany was chosen in 1921 as a country seat for the Head of the Czechoslovak State. Tomas Garrigue Masaryk The first President of Czechoslovakia, Tomas Garrigue Masaryk became very fond of Lany Chateau. Following his abdication in 1935, he was permitted to move to Lany with his family permanently. In the end he chose Lany as his last place of rest for himself and his family. The grave of the Masaryk family has become a symbol of Czechoslovak democracy, especially in the times of a totalitarian regime. Following the death of T.G. Masaryk, the Lany Chateau was utilized sporadically. During World War II, State President Dr. Emil Hacha resided in Lany. Only Vaclav Havel in his office as President began to visit Lany on a regular basis once again. You can reach Lany from Prague by taking the road in the direction of Karlovy Vary (distance about 35 km). The first President of the Czechoslovak Republic Tomas G. Masaryk and his family are buried in the Lany cemetery. Regular services are held in the church Name of Jesus, adjacent to the Chateau: on Thursdays and Saturdays at 5 p m., in winter at 4 p.m., on Sundays at 3 p.m. The park is open to visitors (open to the public since 1990): Wednesday and Thursday from 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday, Sunday and holidays from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. each year in the period from the Saturday before Easter until November 2 and on the day of the birth and on the day of the death of the president T. G. Masaryk (March 7 and September 14 - the Park is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.). The Chateau is not usually open to the public (on March 7, 2000 the Chateau was opened to the public for the first time).
Karlovy Vary is a town in Bohemia, in the west of Czechia. In English, it is sometimes called also Carlsbad (after the German name Karlsbad). It is a very famous spa resort, visited by many celebrities from all over the world. It is also known for the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival, held there every year. Karlovy Vary is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Czechia. History in a Nutshell The history of Karlovy Vary dates back to the 14th century, when Charles IV founded a spa there, named Horké Lázně u Lokte, which means “hot spas at Loket“. Charles IV was the same king after whom the famous Charles Bridge in Prague was named. The settlement was renamed to Karlovy Vary later and was granted town privileges in 1370. Karl is the Czech version of the name “Charles” and vary is the plural of var meaning “boiling”. The name of the town may be therefore understood more or less as “Charles’s Hot Springs”. Karlovy Vary owes its development into one of Europe’s most popular spa towns to the publications of David Becher and Josef von Löschner in the late 18th and the 19th century. The number of visitors grew steadily and before the outbreak of World War I, around 70,000 people visited the spa town yearly. Among them were many aristocrats, politicians, artists and very affluent people. In 1918, after World War I, the town was incorporated into the independent Czechoslovak state. In 1929, Karlovy Vary Airport was opened. The majority of the town’s population in the interwar period was German-speaking. In 1938, the town was incorporated into Nazi Germany as part of the Sudetenland according the terms of the Munich Agreement. After World War II, most of the German population was expelled. In 1946, the first edition of Karlovy Vary International Film Festival was organized in the town. Between 1948 and 1989 all spa establishments and resorts were nationalized and controlled by the communist state. Since the collapse of communism in 1989, the town has been gradually restored to its former glory. Its center is bustling with life and visitors can enjoy a very wide variety of spa treatments. Things to See in Karlovy Vary Many visitors come to the town to enjoy wellness treatments or to attend the famous film festival, but fans of regular sightseeing shouldn’t be disappointed, either. The town has quite a few remarkable landmarks and sights. Colonnades are a characteristic element in the cityscape of Karlovy Vary. Thanks to the colonnades, visitors may enjoy the springs also during rainy weather. There are five colonnades in the town: The Market Colonnade (Tržní kolonáda) is a white, wooden structure in the center of the town on the left bank of the Teplá river. It was created by the Austrian architects Ferdinand Fellner and Hermann Helmer in the Swiss chalet style and opened to the public in 1883. The Mill Colonnade (Mlýnská kolonáda) is the largest of all colonnades in the town. It is located in the spa center on Mlýnské Nábřeží Street. This colonnade is the work of the famous Czech architect Josef Zítek, who built it in the Neoclassical style. It was opened in 1881. The Mill Colonnade houses the seeps of five mineral springs. The Castle Colonnade (Zámecká kolonáda) is located near Zámecký Vrch Street. It was designed by the Austrian architect Friedrich Ohmann in the Art Nouveau style and opened in 1912. Nowadays, it is only partially accessible to the general public, because in the early 21st century, the Castle Spa was established there and only guests may stay there. The arbour with the Upper Castle Spring (Horní zámecký pramen) is still open to the public. The Park Colonnade (Sadová kolonáda) is located in Dvořák’s Park (Dvořákovy sady), next to Zahradní Street. This is another colonnade designed by Ferdinand Fellner and Hermann Helmer. It was opened in 1881 and it houses the seep of Snake Spring (Hadí pramen). The Hot Spring Colonnade (Vřídelní kolonáda) is located in the spa center, next to Divadelní Square (Divadelní náměstí). It houses the most spectacular of the town’s geysers: Hot Spring (Pramen Vřídlo). Its water has a temperature of 72 °C ( 161.6 °F) and the jet reaches a height of approx. 12 m (39 ft). Around 2,000 liters (528 gallons) of mineral water are gushed every minute. The water is partially diverted to several smaller fountains with lower temperatures, suitable for drinking. The colonnade is the work of Jaroslav Otruba (he is also known for designing stations of the Prague Metro) and was completed in 1975. The current construction replaced an earlier cast-iron structure designed by the aforementioned Ferdinand Fellner and Hermann Helmer. Another feature of the cityscape of Karlovy Vary are arbours and gazebos. Several of them are located on the nearby hills and serve as lookouts offering great panoramic views of the town and the region: ◾Camera Obscura Arbour (altán Camera obscura) – below Three Crosses Hill (Tříkřížový vrch) ◾Arbour at the Three Crosses (altán u Tří křížů) – on Three Crosses Hill (Tříkřížový vrch) ◾Mayer’s Gloriette (Mayerův gloriet) – on a rock promontory at Deer Jump (Jelení skok) Perhaps the most beautiful of all arbours is the Freedom Spring Arbour (altán pramene Svoboda), located near Spa III (Lazně III) next to Mlýnské Nábřeží Street. Unlike many other of the town’s arbours, Freedom Spring Arbour is not a lookout, but it houses the seep of Freedom Spring (pramen Svoboda). If you like panoramic views, in Karlovy Vary you may enjoy them also from several lookout towers: Diana Observation Tower (Rozhledna Diana) is located very close to the town centre, at an elevation of 562 metres (1843 ft) above sea level. It is easily accessible by funicular from Grandhotel Pupp. If you would like to use your muscles instead, there are several hiking trails leading there. The Castle Tower (Zámecká věž) is located in the centre of the town, not far from the Market Colonnade. The tower is the last remnant of the castle that Charles IV built there in the 14th century. The castle burned down in the 17th century, but the tower survived. Visitors can climb the tower and enjoy a spectacular view of the downtown. Goethe’s Lookout (Rozhledna Goethova vyhlídka) is a beautiful Neo-Gothic tower located on top of a hill called Height of Eternal Life (Výšina věčného života). As some of the town’s collonades, this tower was also designed by Ferdinand Fellner and Hermann Helmer. Unfortunately, at the time of writing, Goethe’s Lookout was not open to the public. Hopefully, this will change in the future. Getting to Karlovy Vary There is an international airport in Karlovy Vary (KLV), but the number of flights and destinations is very limited. At the time of writing, it serves regular flights to Moscow and seasonal flights to Tashkent. The lack of direct and convenient flight connections should not discourage you by any means, because the airport in Prague (PRG) is only 120 km (74.5 mi) away. There are some direct bus connections from that airport to Karlovy Vary. However, Prague Florenc Bus Station offers more connections, so it can be a more convenient option sometimes. Detailed timetables listing all options can be found here. At the time of writing, the fastest train-only option from Prague takes 3 h 13 min, because the train goes to several other towns (e.g. Most) before reaching Karlovy Vary. As a result of this, the route is 236 km (146 mi) long and the journey takes significantly longer than the bus connections. The route from Prague to Karlovy Vary via Most is reported to be quite picturesque, so it may be also a viable option for rail travel enthusiasts. The most convenient, comfortable and also fast alternative is booking private transportation. Obviously, it’s more expensive than public transportation, but it costs less than you would probably expect. Especially, if you travel in a group of several people, private transportation can be very attractive and the cost per person is not high at all. The Czech market leader in this field is Prague Airport Transfers. They can drive you from Prague Airport or from a hotel in Prague to Karlovy Vary or another place in Czechia or even Central Europe. You have choose between a sedan car or a minibus, depending on the number of people in your group. It is much better than a taxi, because their rates are much lower than regular taxis and you know the fare in advance, so you’ll never get overcharged. Here are their fares and conditions from Prague to Karlovy Vary. Popular Events The Karlovy Vary International Film Festival (Mezinárodní filmový festival Karlovy Vary) is obviously the most popular event in the town. It is held every year in July. It has been organized continuously since 1946 and is widely considered the most important film event in Central Europe. Films from many countries compete in several categories and the main award for the best film is the Crystal Globe. Opening of the Spa Season (Zahájení lázeňské sezóny) takes place on one weekend at the end of April or at the beginning of May. The highlight of the event is a parade of people in historical costumes, featuring Charles IV, the founder of the town. It is accompanied by a crafts fair and concerts. Dvořák’s Karlovy Vary Autumn Festival (Dvořákův karlovarský podzim) belongs to the oldest music festivals in Europe. It is dedicated to the famous Czech composer Antonín Dvořák and has been held every autumn since 1959. The exact dates and details can be found on the website of the Karlovy Vary Symphony Orchestra. Interesting Places Nearby ◾Loket – a beautiful medieval town, with a very impressive castle ◾Františkovy Lázně – another famous spa town ◾Mariánské Lázně – yet another well-known spa town in the West-Bohemian Spa Triangle
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Karlovy Vary
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Karlovy Vary is a town in Bohemia, in the west of Czechia. In English, it is sometimes called also Carlsbad (after the German name Karlsbad). It is a very famous spa resort, visited by many celebrities from all over the world. It is also known for the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival, held there every year. Karlovy Vary is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Czechia. History in a Nutshell The history of Karlovy Vary dates back to the 14th century, when Charles IV founded a spa there, named Horké Lázně u Lokte, which means “hot spas at Loket“. Charles IV was the same king after whom the famous Charles Bridge in Prague was named. The settlement was renamed to Karlovy Vary later and was granted town privileges in 1370. Karl is the Czech version of the name “Charles” and vary is the plural of var meaning “boiling”. The name of the town may be therefore understood more or less as “Charles’s Hot Springs”. Karlovy Vary owes its development into one of Europe’s most popular spa towns to the publications of David Becher and Josef von Löschner in the late 18th and the 19th century. The number of visitors grew steadily and before the outbreak of World War I, around 70,000 people visited the spa town yearly. Among them were many aristocrats, politicians, artists and very affluent people. In 1918, after World War I, the town was incorporated into the independent Czechoslovak state. In 1929, Karlovy Vary Airport was opened. The majority of the town’s population in the interwar period was German-speaking. In 1938, the town was incorporated into Nazi Germany as part of the Sudetenland according the terms of the Munich Agreement. After World War II, most of the German population was expelled. In 1946, the first edition of Karlovy Vary International Film Festival was organized in the town. Between 1948 and 1989 all spa establishments and resorts were nationalized and controlled by the communist state. Since the collapse of communism in 1989, the town has been gradually restored to its former glory. Its center is bustling with life and visitors can enjoy a very wide variety of spa treatments. Things to See in Karlovy Vary Many visitors come to the town to enjoy wellness treatments or to attend the famous film festival, but fans of regular sightseeing shouldn’t be disappointed, either. The town has quite a few remarkable landmarks and sights. Colonnades are a characteristic element in the cityscape of Karlovy Vary. Thanks to the colonnades, visitors may enjoy the springs also during rainy weather. There are five colonnades in the town: The Market Colonnade (Tržní kolonáda) is a white, wooden structure in the center of the town on the left bank of the Teplá river. It was created by the Austrian architects Ferdinand Fellner and Hermann Helmer in the Swiss chalet style and opened to the public in 1883. The Mill Colonnade (Mlýnská kolonáda) is the largest of all colonnades in the town. It is located in the spa center on Mlýnské Nábřeží Street. This colonnade is the work of the famous Czech architect Josef Zítek, who built it in the Neoclassical style. It was opened in 1881. The Mill Colonnade houses the seeps of five mineral springs. The Castle Colonnade (Zámecká kolonáda) is located near Zámecký Vrch Street. It was designed by the Austrian architect Friedrich Ohmann in the Art Nouveau style and opened in 1912. Nowadays, it is only partially accessible to the general public, because in the early 21st century, the Castle Spa was established there and only guests may stay there. The arbour with the Upper Castle Spring (Horní zámecký pramen) is still open to the public. The Park Colonnade (Sadová kolonáda) is located in Dvořák’s Park (Dvořákovy sady), next to Zahradní Street. This is another colonnade designed by Ferdinand Fellner and Hermann Helmer. It was opened in 1881 and it houses the seep of Snake Spring (Hadí pramen). The Hot Spring Colonnade (Vřídelní kolonáda) is located in the spa center, next to Divadelní Square (Divadelní náměstí). It houses the most spectacular of the town’s geysers: Hot Spring (Pramen Vřídlo). Its water has a temperature of 72 °C ( 161.6 °F) and the jet reaches a height of approx. 12 m (39 ft). Around 2,000 liters (528 gallons) of mineral water are gushed every minute. The water is partially diverted to several smaller fountains with lower temperatures, suitable for drinking. The colonnade is the work of Jaroslav Otruba (he is also known for designing stations of the Prague Metro) and was completed in 1975. The current construction replaced an earlier cast-iron structure designed by the aforementioned Ferdinand Fellner and Hermann Helmer. Another feature of the cityscape of Karlovy Vary are arbours and gazebos. Several of them are located on the nearby hills and serve as lookouts offering great panoramic views of the town and the region: ◾Camera Obscura Arbour (altán Camera obscura) – below Three Crosses Hill (Tříkřížový vrch) ◾Arbour at the Three Crosses (altán u Tří křížů) – on Three Crosses Hill (Tříkřížový vrch) ◾Mayer’s Gloriette (Mayerův gloriet) – on a rock promontory at Deer Jump (Jelení skok) Perhaps the most beautiful of all arbours is the Freedom Spring Arbour (altán pramene Svoboda), located near Spa III (Lazně III) next to Mlýnské Nábřeží Street. Unlike many other of the town’s arbours, Freedom Spring Arbour is not a lookout, but it houses the seep of Freedom Spring (pramen Svoboda). If you like panoramic views, in Karlovy Vary you may enjoy them also from several lookout towers: Diana Observation Tower (Rozhledna Diana) is located very close to the town centre, at an elevation of 562 metres (1843 ft) above sea level. It is easily accessible by funicular from Grandhotel Pupp. If you would like to use your muscles instead, there are several hiking trails leading there. The Castle Tower (Zámecká věž) is located in the centre of the town, not far from the Market Colonnade. The tower is the last remnant of the castle that Charles IV built there in the 14th century. The castle burned down in the 17th century, but the tower survived. Visitors can climb the tower and enjoy a spectacular view of the downtown. Goethe’s Lookout (Rozhledna Goethova vyhlídka) is a beautiful Neo-Gothic tower located on top of a hill called Height of Eternal Life (Výšina věčného života). As some of the town’s collonades, this tower was also designed by Ferdinand Fellner and Hermann Helmer. Unfortunately, at the time of writing, Goethe’s Lookout was not open to the public. Hopefully, this will change in the future. Getting to Karlovy Vary There is an international airport in Karlovy Vary (KLV), but the number of flights and destinations is very limited. At the time of writing, it serves regular flights to Moscow and seasonal flights to Tashkent. The lack of direct and convenient flight connections should not discourage you by any means, because the airport in Prague (PRG) is only 120 km (74.5 mi) away. There are some direct bus connections from that airport to Karlovy Vary. However, Prague Florenc Bus Station offers more connections, so it can be a more convenient option sometimes. Detailed timetables listing all options can be found here. At the time of writing, the fastest train-only option from Prague takes 3 h 13 min, because the train goes to several other towns (e.g. Most) before reaching Karlovy Vary. As a result of this, the route is 236 km (146 mi) long and the journey takes significantly longer than the bus connections. The route from Prague to Karlovy Vary via Most is reported to be quite picturesque, so it may be also a viable option for rail travel enthusiasts. The most convenient, comfortable and also fast alternative is booking private transportation. Obviously, it’s more expensive than public transportation, but it costs less than you would probably expect. Especially, if you travel in a group of several people, private transportation can be very attractive and the cost per person is not high at all. The Czech market leader in this field is Prague Airport Transfers. They can drive you from Prague Airport or from a hotel in Prague to Karlovy Vary or another place in Czechia or even Central Europe. You have choose between a sedan car or a minibus, depending on the number of people in your group. It is much better than a taxi, because their rates are much lower than regular taxis and you know the fare in advance, so you’ll never get overcharged. Here are their fares and conditions from Prague to Karlovy Vary. Popular Events The Karlovy Vary International Film Festival (Mezinárodní filmový festival Karlovy Vary) is obviously the most popular event in the town. It is held every year in July. It has been organized continuously since 1946 and is widely considered the most important film event in Central Europe. Films from many countries compete in several categories and the main award for the best film is the Crystal Globe. Opening of the Spa Season (Zahájení lázeňské sezóny) takes place on one weekend at the end of April or at the beginning of May. The highlight of the event is a parade of people in historical costumes, featuring Charles IV, the founder of the town. It is accompanied by a crafts fair and concerts. Dvořák’s Karlovy Vary Autumn Festival (Dvořákův karlovarský podzim) belongs to the oldest music festivals in Europe. It is dedicated to the famous Czech composer Antonín Dvořák and has been held every autumn since 1959. The exact dates and details can be found on the website of the Karlovy Vary Symphony Orchestra. Interesting Places Nearby ◾Loket – a beautiful medieval town, with a very impressive castle ◾Františkovy Lázně – another famous spa town ◾Mariánské Lázně – yet another well-known spa town in the West-Bohemian Spa Triangle
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Praga
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Křivoklát
location
Village Nouzov is located in the direct vicinity of the Křivoklát Forest and the protected area “Kačák”.
Nouzov
Village Nouzov is located in the direct vicinity of the Křivoklát Forest and the protected area “Kačák”.
Complete amenities (doctor, shopping center, post office, school, bank, pharmacy, gas station, sports hall, cinema etc.) is available in the 4.5 km distant village Unhost with 5000 inhabitants. In Nouzov there is a restaurant, a large garden and tennis courts. In neighboring villages within a distance of 3 km there are more restaurants, shops, golf course and swimming pool. There is also sports airport about 7 km away from the Nouzov.
Unhošť
Complete amenities (doctor, shopping center, post office, school, bank, pharmacy, gas station, sports hall, cinema etc.) is available in the 4.5 km distant village Unhost with 5000 inhabitants. In Nouzov there is a restaurant, a large garden and tennis courts. In neighboring villages within a distance of 3 km there are more restaurants, shops, golf course and swimming pool. There is also sports airport about 7 km away from the Nouzov.
A romantic valley in the northwest of the capital city is among the most rugged and picturesque areas within Prague and genuinely lets you forget you are – actually – still in Prague. Its territory is considered unique nationwide, from a geological, archaeological, botanical and zoological point of view. It is a landscape of steep rocks, upland plateaux, grove, meadow, and grassland habitats, dramatically sculpted by the Šárecký brook. Marked trails traverse the valley, but a good pair of walking shoes isa must as the paths are not paved.
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Divoká Šárka
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A romantic valley in the northwest of the capital city is among the most rugged and picturesque areas within Prague and genuinely lets you forget you are – actually – still in Prague. Its territory is considered unique nationwide, from a geological, archaeological, botanical and zoological point of view. It is a landscape of steep rocks, upland plateaux, grove, meadow, and grassland habitats, dramatically sculpted by the Šárecký brook. Marked trails traverse the valley, but a good pair of walking shoes isa must as the paths are not paved.
The nature reserve Dalej Valley (Dalejské údolí) spreads along the Dalejský potok stream from the Řeporyje district to its confluence with the Prokopský potok stream from where it is called Prokop Valley nature reserve (Prokopské údolí) that is bordered by the Hlubočepy city district on its other end. In the north the territory of the park borders on Jinonice, in the northwest of the Stodůlky district and in the south Holyně district. Thanks to its karst area, deposit of fossils and occurrence of protected plants Prokop and Dalej Valleys were declared a nature reserve. It presents the only large piece of nature that is located in the neighborhood of the surrounding housing estates of Prague 5 and so it is an ideal place for local residents to enjoy nature walks. It is pleasant to stop by, for example, the Hlubočepy’s Jezírko (Small Lake), a water-filled former limestone quarry. In the valley there are many points of interest, among others, for example, the Prokop quarry where according to a legend Saint Prokop used to live in a cave and where there also used to be a church of Saint Prokop with a hermitage. Part of the Prokop Valley is also the Děvín Hill with the surrounding hills called Dívčí hrady (Maidens’ Castles). A hiking trail and a railroad track lead through the valley with the Praha-Holyně train stop. If you are a cycling fan you can take the bike trail A12 from Hlubočepy to Stodůlky and Řeporyje.
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Prokop valley
1 Prokopské údolí
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The nature reserve Dalej Valley (Dalejské údolí) spreads along the Dalejský potok stream from the Řeporyje district to its confluence with the Prokopský potok stream from where it is called Prokop Valley nature reserve (Prokopské údolí) that is bordered by the Hlubočepy city district on its other end. In the north the territory of the park borders on Jinonice, in the northwest of the Stodůlky district and in the south Holyně district. Thanks to its karst area, deposit of fossils and occurrence of protected plants Prokop and Dalej Valleys were declared a nature reserve. It presents the only large piece of nature that is located in the neighborhood of the surrounding housing estates of Prague 5 and so it is an ideal place for local residents to enjoy nature walks. It is pleasant to stop by, for example, the Hlubočepy’s Jezírko (Small Lake), a water-filled former limestone quarry. In the valley there are many points of interest, among others, for example, the Prokop quarry where according to a legend Saint Prokop used to live in a cave and where there also used to be a church of Saint Prokop with a hermitage. Part of the Prokop Valley is also the Děvín Hill with the surrounding hills called Dívčí hrady (Maidens’ Castles). A hiking trail and a railroad track lead through the valley with the Praha-Holyně train stop. If you are a cycling fan you can take the bike trail A12 from Hlubočepy to Stodůlky and Řeporyje.
An oasis of peace and relaxation, an island of greenery in the midst of a noisy metropolis: All this and more awaits you in the Royal deer-park, better known as the Stromovka, Prague’s largest park. This roughly 100 hectare (250 acre) site is open every day to a whole gamut of visitors. Here you will find Bohemian hipsters, lovey-dovey couples, joggers, in-line skaters and cyclists, families with kids of all ages, and dogs with their owners. From time to time you’ll come across a wedding ceremony held under the romantic canopy of ancient trees. Stromovka park has its unmistakable charm and takes life at its own pace. Many of you may have no idea that this park in Holešovice has its own reasons to celebrate another “fateful eight” year. The park dates back to 1268, founded by king Přemysl Otakar II to please himself and his Royal Court with a hunting-ground, and above it, a small Summer Palace. 750 years … that’ quite a bit of history. But let’s begin at the beginning. The Royal hunting-ground’s heyday was during the Hapsburg dynasty in the 16th and early 17th century. Emperor Ferdinand I expanded it in 1536-1548 and joined it through to Prague Castle. A pond was excavated, new trees planted, and a pheasant farm and hunting lodge built, later followed-up with a fruit garden. At the western edge, an Imperial mill sprang up, with a late-Renaissance gate, there to this day. Under Emperor Rudolph II the old Summer Palace got a Renaissance facelift and the original pond was generously enlarged to 21 hectares (52 acres). An island was raised in the middle, its remnant today dubbed Oak hillock – a central rise with ancient oak trees. The large pond was fed from Rudolph’s water tunnel – a technical feature remarkable in its day, still in service. It brought water from the Vltava River a hundred meters away (from near today’s Štefánik Bridge) through Letná hill; the entrance has a fine Renaissance portal inscribed with 1583 and the monogram of Rudolf II. A less happy era for the Royal hunting-ground came in the 17th and 18th century, when numerous military conflicts left their destructive mark – it was picked as an ideal military encampment site, more than once. The modern history of this now public park in the English style with landscaped horticultural sections dates from 1804. Rudolf’s pond was partially filled-in, creating several smaller bodies of water and a sizeable clutch of meadows. The picturesque natural composition was rounded off with the planting of many ornamental and exotic tree species. During this time the Summer House, then in ruins, (since 1849 dubbed the “Governor’s”) was rebuilt in neo-Gothic style; and its surroundings made duly romantic. The Royal hunting-ground areas were joined up by pavements and paths, and the first gazebos, benches, and pond piers added. In the mid 19th century it got its current Prague vernacular name, the “Stromovka” – a loose translation of the German “Baumgarten”. Its final layout was set at the end of the 19th century by the building of the canal and railway line in the upper part of the Park, the tram loop on the East side, and definitively, by the construction of the Exhibition Grounds. The most notable Stromovka building is Šlechtova restaurant, originally the Royal Hall from 1689-1691. The large hall was adorned with frescoes by Jan Jakub Steinfels depicting Apollo, Venus and Cupid, and other legendary scenes. A hundred years later, the building was rebuilt as a garden restaurant by František Antonín Herget, and again in 1855 in the neo-Gothic style by Bernard Grueber. In 1882 the restaurant was rented out by Václav Šlechta (hence the name), who ran it until the outbreak of World War II. His business prospered and it became an unmissable refreshments spot for anyone taking a Sunday stroll. In the postwar period, the “Šlechtovka” became dilapidated, through socialist economic stewardship, and several fires. The ravages of time were topped-off by the floods in 2002. Literally at the eleventh hour this architecturally valuable building got its reprieve, and should once again be open to the public after the refurbishment completes, during next year. Present-day Stromovka is writ large in the civic life of Prague and there is no sign of anything changing in that regard. On the contrary – the Park has latterly seen costly modernization, to match 21st century trends. Most notably, the central part has seen quite a transformation, bringing four kilometres of renovated paths, new ponds, footbridges and piers, several playgrounds, picnic sites and outdoor fitness installations. Additional updates, in the form of new lighting, benches and waste bins, are due this year. Certainly worth a mention are the unconventional children’s playground elements, restored by Prague City Hall last year. These include the original reinforced concrete sculptures made more than 50 years ago by sculptor Olbram Zoubek and his wife Eva Kmentová. The overall effect is that of an outdoor gallery, bringing the public space to life. Not surprisingly, the positive changes in the Park’s infrastructure are reflected in its visitor numbers – Stromovka Park gets 4 million visitors a year.
Stromovka
An oasis of peace and relaxation, an island of greenery in the midst of a noisy metropolis: All this and more awaits you in the Royal deer-park, better known as the Stromovka, Prague’s largest park. This roughly 100 hectare (250 acre) site is open every day to a whole gamut of visitors. Here you will find Bohemian hipsters, lovey-dovey couples, joggers, in-line skaters and cyclists, families with kids of all ages, and dogs with their owners. From time to time you’ll come across a wedding ceremony held under the romantic canopy of ancient trees. Stromovka park has its unmistakable charm and takes life at its own pace. Many of you may have no idea that this park in Holešovice has its own reasons to celebrate another “fateful eight” year. The park dates back to 1268, founded by king Přemysl Otakar II to please himself and his Royal Court with a hunting-ground, and above it, a small Summer Palace. 750 years … that’ quite a bit of history. But let’s begin at the beginning. The Royal hunting-ground’s heyday was during the Hapsburg dynasty in the 16th and early 17th century. Emperor Ferdinand I expanded it in 1536-1548 and joined it through to Prague Castle. A pond was excavated, new trees planted, and a pheasant farm and hunting lodge built, later followed-up with a fruit garden. At the western edge, an Imperial mill sprang up, with a late-Renaissance gate, there to this day. Under Emperor Rudolph II the old Summer Palace got a Renaissance facelift and the original pond was generously enlarged to 21 hectares (52 acres). An island was raised in the middle, its remnant today dubbed Oak hillock – a central rise with ancient oak trees. The large pond was fed from Rudolph’s water tunnel – a technical feature remarkable in its day, still in service. It brought water from the Vltava River a hundred meters away (from near today’s Štefánik Bridge) through Letná hill; the entrance has a fine Renaissance portal inscribed with 1583 and the monogram of Rudolf II. A less happy era for the Royal hunting-ground came in the 17th and 18th century, when numerous military conflicts left their destructive mark – it was picked as an ideal military encampment site, more than once. The modern history of this now public park in the English style with landscaped horticultural sections dates from 1804. Rudolf’s pond was partially filled-in, creating several smaller bodies of water and a sizeable clutch of meadows. The picturesque natural composition was rounded off with the planting of many ornamental and exotic tree species. During this time the Summer House, then in ruins, (since 1849 dubbed the “Governor’s”) was rebuilt in neo-Gothic style; and its surroundings made duly romantic. The Royal hunting-ground areas were joined up by pavements and paths, and the first gazebos, benches, and pond piers added. In the mid 19th century it got its current Prague vernacular name, the “Stromovka” – a loose translation of the German “Baumgarten”. Its final layout was set at the end of the 19th century by the building of the canal and railway line in the upper part of the Park, the tram loop on the East side, and definitively, by the construction of the Exhibition Grounds. The most notable Stromovka building is Šlechtova restaurant, originally the Royal Hall from 1689-1691. The large hall was adorned with frescoes by Jan Jakub Steinfels depicting Apollo, Venus and Cupid, and other legendary scenes. A hundred years later, the building was rebuilt as a garden restaurant by František Antonín Herget, and again in 1855 in the neo-Gothic style by Bernard Grueber. In 1882 the restaurant was rented out by Václav Šlechta (hence the name), who ran it until the outbreak of World War II. His business prospered and it became an unmissable refreshments spot for anyone taking a Sunday stroll. In the postwar period, the “Šlechtovka” became dilapidated, through socialist economic stewardship, and several fires. The ravages of time were topped-off by the floods in 2002. Literally at the eleventh hour this architecturally valuable building got its reprieve, and should once again be open to the public after the refurbishment completes, during next year. Present-day Stromovka is writ large in the civic life of Prague and there is no sign of anything changing in that regard. On the contrary – the Park has latterly seen costly modernization, to match 21st century trends. Most notably, the central part has seen quite a transformation, bringing four kilometres of renovated paths, new ponds, footbridges and piers, several playgrounds, picnic sites and outdoor fitness installations. Additional updates, in the form of new lighting, benches and waste bins, are due this year. Certainly worth a mention are the unconventional children’s playground elements, restored by Prague City Hall last year. These include the original reinforced concrete sculptures made more than 50 years ago by sculptor Olbram Zoubek and his wife Eva Kmentová. The overall effect is that of an outdoor gallery, bringing the public space to life. Not surprisingly, the positive changes in the Park’s infrastructure are reflected in its visitor numbers – Stromovka Park gets 4 million visitors a year.
(Petřínská rozhledna) Petřín Lookout Tower, one of the most prominent landmarks of Prague, was built as part of the Jubilee Exhibition in 1891 as a loose copy inspired by the Eiffel Tower (at a ratio of 1:5). It is 63.5 metres high, and 299 steps lead to its peak, which is at the same altitude as the real Eiffel Tower. The view from its top overlooks not only the whole city, but on a clear day you can see nearly all of Bohemia.
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Torre Petřín
633 Petřínské sady
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(Petřínská rozhledna) Petřín Lookout Tower, one of the most prominent landmarks of Prague, was built as part of the Jubilee Exhibition in 1891 as a loose copy inspired by the Eiffel Tower (at a ratio of 1:5). It is 63.5 metres high, and 299 steps lead to its peak, which is at the same altitude as the real Eiffel Tower. The view from its top overlooks not only the whole city, but on a clear day you can see nearly all of Bohemia.
Prohlídka památek
An extent ruin of a Gothic castle from the 14th century, rebuilt in the Late Gothic and renaissance. Deserted in the late 18th century. The complex of the castle ruin with a characteristic torso of a prismatic tower with remains of an Early Gothic chapel with a semi-round bastion. In case of danger the moat around the castle could have been flooded.
Okoř
An extent ruin of a Gothic castle from the 14th century, rebuilt in the Late Gothic and renaissance. Deserted in the late 18th century. The complex of the castle ruin with a characteristic torso of a prismatic tower with remains of an Early Gothic chapel with a semi-round bastion. In case of danger the moat around the castle could have been flooded.
History of Lidice Village this village, the name of which became a symbol of Fascist despotism in World War II, lies 20 km west of Prague and eight km from Kladno. Lidice is first mentioned in chronicles in l318. The oldest public building was St. Martin's church (1352). It was destroyed in the Hussite wars, but Utraquist priests were preaching here as late as in the 16th century. It was again destroyed during the Thirty years' War, and Grand Duchess Marie Anna of Tuscany had a new, Baroque church built which was restyled several times in the following years. The village school is first mentioned in records from 1713 when it had 127 pupils. It had a simple system of central heating and was evidently the first of its kind in Bohemia. A new one-storeyed school was built in 1824. The expansion of industries in Kladno (coal-mining, lighting of the first blast furnace in 1855) turned Lidice into a busy mining village in the 2nd half of the l9th century. Whereas, in 1848 it had 270 inhabitants living in 33 houses, by 1890 the figures had risen to 506 people and 50 houses. The Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia had tragic consequences for Lidice. In order to suppress the growing anti-Fascist resistance movement, security police chief SS Obergruppenfuhrer – Reinherd Heydrich was appointed deputy Reichsprotektor in September l941. During his short reign of terror, 5000 anti-Fascist fighters and their helpers were imprisoned. The courts working under martial law were kept busy and the Nazis even had people summarily executed without a trial in order to spread fear throughout the country. Many people from Kladno district died on the scaffold or in concentration camps. The lot of the Czech nation was complicated by the decision of the Czechoslovak government in London to get rid of Heydrich. The operation by Czechoslovak parachutists in which Heydrich was mortally wounded on May 27, 1942 brought reprisals which shocked the whole world. The vague contents of a letter, addressed to a woman employed in a Slaný factory and held back by the factory co-owner, J. Pála, roused the suspicions of the Kladno Gestapo that there was some connection between Heydrich's assassination and the Horák family in Lidice who had a son serving in the Czechoslovak army in Britain. Although investigations and a house-search produced no compromising material, weapons or transmitter, the Nazis needed to carry out an act of vengeance for the death of "an outstanding man of the German nation", and for this they chose the people of Lidice. The tragedy of this little village and its 503 inhabitants began on June 10, 1942 a few hours after midnight. The events of that summer day are recorded in a documentary, filmed by those who actually carried out that brutal crime against innocent people. Although a silent film, it can be understood by all people, irrespective of their color or tongue. This film served as document No. 379 at the Nuremberg trials of the Nazi German leaders in 1945. Parts of the film are shown on a video recording at the Lidice museum. At the orders of K. H. Frank 173 Lidice men were shot on that fateful day in the garden of the Horak farm. The women and children were taken to the gymnasium of Kladno grammar school. Three days later the children were taken from their mothers and, except for those selected for re-education in German families and babies under one year of age, were poisoned by exhaust gas in specially adapted vehicles in the Nazi extermination camp at Chełmno upon Nerr in Poland. The women were sent to Ravensbruck concentration camp which usually meant quick or lingering death for the inmates. Having rid the village of its inhabitants, the Nazis began to destroy the village itself, first setting the houses on fire and then razing them to the ground with plastic explosives. They did not stop at that but proceeded to destroy the church and even the last place of rest - the cemetery. In 1943 all that remained was an empty space. Until the end of the war the sight was marked by notices forbidding entry. The news of the destruction of Lidice spread rapidly around the world. But the Nazi intention to wipe the little Czech village off the face of the Earth did not succeed. Several villages throughout the world took over the name of Lidice in memory of that village, and many women born at that time and given the name of Lidice still bear it today. Lidice continued to live in the minds of people all over the world, and after the war the Czechoslovak government's decision to build it again was declared at a peace demonstration on June 10, 1945 at Lidice which was attended by Lidice women who had survived. 340 Lidice citizens were murdered by the Nazis, 143 Lidice women returned home after the war ended, and after a two-year search 17 children were restored to their mothers. In 1947 the foundation stone of a new Lidice was laid 300 meters away from the original site and in May 1948 work began on building the first houses. A modern village of 150 houses gradually arose with the enormous help of volunteers from all over the Republic as well as from abroad. The present council house, post office, house of culture and shopping center were built at the same time. The old site was preserved as a memorial including the common grave of the Lidice men, a monument and museum, and between it and the new village a "Garden of Peace and Friendship" was opened on June 19, 1955 where thousands of rose-bushes from various parts of the world were planted. And so, the life of the village stopped for a short time, only to blaze up from little spark into a huge flame, thanks to the help of all willing people from the whole world. What direction it will take in the future lies only in the hands of its present inhabitants. Stop here and pay a silent tribute to the innocent Lidice victims, and visit the museum where facts and documents of the Lidice tragedy are collected, the rose garden, memorial site and the new village.
Lidice
History of Lidice Village this village, the name of which became a symbol of Fascist despotism in World War II, lies 20 km west of Prague and eight km from Kladno. Lidice is first mentioned in chronicles in l318. The oldest public building was St. Martin's church (1352). It was destroyed in the Hussite wars, but Utraquist priests were preaching here as late as in the 16th century. It was again destroyed during the Thirty years' War, and Grand Duchess Marie Anna of Tuscany had a new, Baroque church built which was restyled several times in the following years. The village school is first mentioned in records from 1713 when it had 127 pupils. It had a simple system of central heating and was evidently the first of its kind in Bohemia. A new one-storeyed school was built in 1824. The expansion of industries in Kladno (coal-mining, lighting of the first blast furnace in 1855) turned Lidice into a busy mining village in the 2nd half of the l9th century. Whereas, in 1848 it had 270 inhabitants living in 33 houses, by 1890 the figures had risen to 506 people and 50 houses. The Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia had tragic consequences for Lidice. In order to suppress the growing anti-Fascist resistance movement, security police chief SS Obergruppenfuhrer – Reinherd Heydrich was appointed deputy Reichsprotektor in September l941. During his short reign of terror, 5000 anti-Fascist fighters and their helpers were imprisoned. The courts working under martial law were kept busy and the Nazis even had people summarily executed without a trial in order to spread fear throughout the country. Many people from Kladno district died on the scaffold or in concentration camps. The lot of the Czech nation was complicated by the decision of the Czechoslovak government in London to get rid of Heydrich. The operation by Czechoslovak parachutists in which Heydrich was mortally wounded on May 27, 1942 brought reprisals which shocked the whole world. The vague contents of a letter, addressed to a woman employed in a Slaný factory and held back by the factory co-owner, J. Pála, roused the suspicions of the Kladno Gestapo that there was some connection between Heydrich's assassination and the Horák family in Lidice who had a son serving in the Czechoslovak army in Britain. Although investigations and a house-search produced no compromising material, weapons or transmitter, the Nazis needed to carry out an act of vengeance for the death of "an outstanding man of the German nation", and for this they chose the people of Lidice. The tragedy of this little village and its 503 inhabitants began on June 10, 1942 a few hours after midnight. The events of that summer day are recorded in a documentary, filmed by those who actually carried out that brutal crime against innocent people. Although a silent film, it can be understood by all people, irrespective of their color or tongue. This film served as document No. 379 at the Nuremberg trials of the Nazi German leaders in 1945. Parts of the film are shown on a video recording at the Lidice museum. At the orders of K. H. Frank 173 Lidice men were shot on that fateful day in the garden of the Horak farm. The women and children were taken to the gymnasium of Kladno grammar school. Three days later the children were taken from their mothers and, except for those selected for re-education in German families and babies under one year of age, were poisoned by exhaust gas in specially adapted vehicles in the Nazi extermination camp at Chełmno upon Nerr in Poland. The women were sent to Ravensbruck concentration camp which usually meant quick or lingering death for the inmates. Having rid the village of its inhabitants, the Nazis began to destroy the village itself, first setting the houses on fire and then razing them to the ground with plastic explosives. They did not stop at that but proceeded to destroy the church and even the last place of rest - the cemetery. In 1943 all that remained was an empty space. Until the end of the war the sight was marked by notices forbidding entry. The news of the destruction of Lidice spread rapidly around the world. But the Nazi intention to wipe the little Czech village off the face of the Earth did not succeed. Several villages throughout the world took over the name of Lidice in memory of that village, and many women born at that time and given the name of Lidice still bear it today. Lidice continued to live in the minds of people all over the world, and after the war the Czechoslovak government's decision to build it again was declared at a peace demonstration on June 10, 1945 at Lidice which was attended by Lidice women who had survived. 340 Lidice citizens were murdered by the Nazis, 143 Lidice women returned home after the war ended, and after a two-year search 17 children were restored to their mothers. In 1947 the foundation stone of a new Lidice was laid 300 meters away from the original site and in May 1948 work began on building the first houses. A modern village of 150 houses gradually arose with the enormous help of volunteers from all over the Republic as well as from abroad. The present council house, post office, house of culture and shopping center were built at the same time. The old site was preserved as a memorial including the common grave of the Lidice men, a monument and museum, and between it and the new village a "Garden of Peace and Friendship" was opened on June 19, 1955 where thousands of rose-bushes from various parts of the world were planted. And so, the life of the village stopped for a short time, only to blaze up from little spark into a huge flame, thanks to the help of all willing people from the whole world. What direction it will take in the future lies only in the hands of its present inhabitants. Stop here and pay a silent tribute to the innocent Lidice victims, and visit the museum where facts and documents of the Lidice tragedy are collected, the rose garden, memorial site and the new village.
Situated on the banks of the river Vltava about twenty miles north of Prague, the chateau of Veltrusy was commissioned in 1704 for the counts of Chotek. Work began around the year 1706 to a tightly symmetrical plan by the Italian-born baroque architect Giovanni Battista Aliprandi. A number of other architects, among them Jan Blažej Santini, participated in the design. The north side of the chateau is enclosed by a colonnade of classical statues by Matthias Bernhard Braun, while a double staircase by the Bavarian sculptor Franz Anton Kuen ascends to the first floor, decked out with lively groups of horses and hunting dogs. Among many later developments, the four wings which radiate diagonally from the central rotunda were extended in the 1750s. The first owner, Václav Antonín Chotek, had hoped that the grounds would rival those of Versailles, but their proximity to the river meant that the French-style gardens frequently flooded, and so the decision was taken to adopt a less formal design in the fashion of an English park. In the late 1700s further flooding caused the stream to be diverted through the park, providing a pleasant meander between statues and temples for visiting dignitaries. These included the Empress Maria Theresa, who in 1754 attended the Great Trade Fair of the Czech Kingdom – the first of its kind in the world – held at Veltrusy to show off the workmanship of Bohemia to an international clientele.
Veltrusy
Situated on the banks of the river Vltava about twenty miles north of Prague, the chateau of Veltrusy was commissioned in 1704 for the counts of Chotek. Work began around the year 1706 to a tightly symmetrical plan by the Italian-born baroque architect Giovanni Battista Aliprandi. A number of other architects, among them Jan Blažej Santini, participated in the design. The north side of the chateau is enclosed by a colonnade of classical statues by Matthias Bernhard Braun, while a double staircase by the Bavarian sculptor Franz Anton Kuen ascends to the first floor, decked out with lively groups of horses and hunting dogs. Among many later developments, the four wings which radiate diagonally from the central rotunda were extended in the 1750s. The first owner, Václav Antonín Chotek, had hoped that the grounds would rival those of Versailles, but their proximity to the river meant that the French-style gardens frequently flooded, and so the decision was taken to adopt a less formal design in the fashion of an English park. In the late 1700s further flooding caused the stream to be diverted through the park, providing a pleasant meander between statues and temples for visiting dignitaries. These included the Empress Maria Theresa, who in 1754 attended the Great Trade Fair of the Czech Kingdom – the first of its kind in the world – held at Veltrusy to show off the workmanship of Bohemia to an international clientele.
activities
Canoe, Raft, Dingy - Berounka
The Berounka is the ideal river for •beginners, •families with children •courageous teachers and camp leaders who wish to take children on a canoeing trip •canoeists – seniors •romantic individuals, who wish to experience the slow current and enjoy the surrounding countryside •people who enjoy super safe trips by canoe, dingy or raft Advice for those of you who are going canoeing for the first time The H2O Sport Sikyta boat hire service has everything you will need for hire: •a boat – Vydra plastic canoes are stable, fast and easy to control. •a life jacket– an essential piece of equipment for non-swimmers and thermal insulation for everyone during bad weather •plastic paddles – we have paddles of various sizes, for adult canoeists and their children •plastic barrel of a volume of 50 litres – the plastic Vydra canoe will carry two barrels Offer for enthusiasts who enjoy a little adrenalin The Berounka River also has one disadvantage and this is poor access. You can get to the starting site in Chrást by train, but the only other access point by train is in Roztoky. For fit and adventurous souls we have a solution: the inflatable Palava canoe – this canoe becomes an easily transported piece of baggage in its bag .
Berounka
The Berounka is the ideal river for •beginners, •families with children •courageous teachers and camp leaders who wish to take children on a canoeing trip •canoeists – seniors •romantic individuals, who wish to experience the slow current and enjoy the surrounding countryside •people who enjoy super safe trips by canoe, dingy or raft Advice for those of you who are going canoeing for the first time The H2O Sport Sikyta boat hire service has everything you will need for hire: •a boat – Vydra plastic canoes are stable, fast and easy to control. •a life jacket– an essential piece of equipment for non-swimmers and thermal insulation for everyone during bad weather •plastic paddles – we have paddles of various sizes, for adult canoeists and their children •plastic barrel of a volume of 50 litres – the plastic Vydra canoe will carry two barrels Offer for enthusiasts who enjoy a little adrenalin The Berounka River also has one disadvantage and this is poor access. You can get to the starting site in Chrást by train, but the only other access point by train is in Roztoky. For fit and adventurous souls we have a solution: the inflatable Palava canoe – this canoe becomes an easily transported piece of baggage in its bag .
flight training ground training time-building adventure and sightseeing flights
airport Kladno
flight training ground training time-building adventure and sightseeing flights
Horní Bezděkov
atypical pool in a shape of a whale with varied depth from 0.2 to 2.0 m
Summer swimming Bažantnice
atypical pool in a shape of a whale with varied depth from 0.2 to 2.0 m
Small zoo animals - U Merlina
Chyňava - Obec
Small zoo animals - U Merlina
Small animals zoo
Buštěhrad
Small animals zoo