Amy’s guidebook

Amy
Amy’s guidebook

Sightseeing

Lovely and local. Can see Belvoir Castle from the end of the road.
87 moradores locais recomendam
Belvoir Castle
87 moradores locais recomendam
Lovely and local. Can see Belvoir Castle from the end of the road.
Newark is a lovely town to have a walk round. Free to look round the castle. Lots of lovely places to eat.
34 moradores locais recomendam
Newark Castle
Castle Gate
34 moradores locais recomendam
Newark is a lovely town to have a walk round. Free to look round the castle. Lots of lovely places to eat.
Isaac Newton changed the world here Without Isaac Newton this small manor would be just another Lincolnshire farmhouse - but in 1665 the plague sent him back from university to this place where he was born. For 18 months Newton worked in solitude, experimenting obsessively, laying foundations for the science of today. Woolsthorpe Manor tells the story of Newton's time at Woolsthorpe, from his birth and childhood to the discoveries of his Year of Wonders. In the 17th century manor house you can stand in the room where he used a prism to split sunlight into the colours of the rainbow, exploring the nature of light. From the window you can see the apple tree in the orchard which inspired his theory of gravity. Coming back to the present day, you can discover Newton's science for yourself in the hands-on Science Centre and walk to the village church (not National Trust) where he was baptised. For more than 300 years people have come to Woolsthorpe, drawn by his story to find their own inspiration in this place of genius.
8 moradores locais recomendam
National Trust Woolsthorpe Manor
Water Lane
8 moradores locais recomendam
Isaac Newton changed the world here Without Isaac Newton this small manor would be just another Lincolnshire farmhouse - but in 1665 the plague sent him back from university to this place where he was born. For 18 months Newton worked in solitude, experimenting obsessively, laying foundations for the science of today. Woolsthorpe Manor tells the story of Newton's time at Woolsthorpe, from his birth and childhood to the discoveries of his Year of Wonders. In the 17th century manor house you can stand in the room where he used a prism to split sunlight into the colours of the rainbow, exploring the nature of light. From the window you can see the apple tree in the orchard which inspired his theory of gravity. Coming back to the present day, you can discover Newton's science for yourself in the hands-on Science Centre and walk to the village church (not National Trust) where he was baptised. For more than 300 years people have come to Woolsthorpe, drawn by his story to find their own inspiration in this place of genius.
With options for corporate days out, have a go shooting days, gun shop & café, Orston Shooting Ground has something for all gun enthusiasts. Please see their website for full details. Bottesford Lane Orston Orston NG13 9NX
Orston Shooting Ground
With options for corporate days out, have a go shooting days, gun shop & café, Orston Shooting Ground has something for all gun enthusiasts. Please see their website for full details. Bottesford Lane Orston Orston NG13 9NX

Food scene

Lovely shops to look round, and an option to grab some food. Great local produce.
16 moradores locais recomendam
The Engine Yard
16 moradores locais recomendam
Lovely shops to look round, and an option to grab some food. Great local produce.
Lovely café located a few minutes walk away. Delicious homemade Breakfasts, Lunches, Cakes, Pastries and sandwiches. Fair trade Coffee and Teas and cold drinks. All available to eat in or takeaway. 12 Queen St, Bottesford, Nottingham NG13 0AH
The poppy seed
Lovely café located a few minutes walk away. Delicious homemade Breakfasts, Lunches, Cakes, Pastries and sandwiches. Fair trade Coffee and Teas and cold drinks. All available to eat in or takeaway. 12 Queen St, Bottesford, Nottingham NG13 0AH
Local Café by day Pizza by night. Located a short walk from accommodation. They serve anything from breakfast baguettes, our famous Pizzini breakfast, freshly made Panini’s and homemade cakes to our delicious pizzas ALL day and Doner Kebabs come 4pm. 5 High St, Nottingham NG13 8AA
PIZZINI
5 High St
Local Café by day Pizza by night. Located a short walk from accommodation. They serve anything from breakfast baguettes, our famous Pizzini breakfast, freshly made Panini’s and homemade cakes to our delicious pizzas ALL day and Doner Kebabs come 4pm. 5 High St, Nottingham NG13 8AA
Pauls Restaurant – Locates a few minutes walk away. Pauls has been serving contemporary cuisine for the last 19 years in the heart of Bottesford, Nottinghamshire. Along with our formal restaurant they have a wine lounge which is a relaxed place to spend the evening. They have a large selection of wines, beers and non-alcoholic beverages with a range of teas and coffees available. 1 Market St, Bottesford, Nottingham NG13 0BW -01949 842375
Pauls Restuarant and Wine Lounge
1 Market St
Pauls Restaurant – Locates a few minutes walk away. Pauls has been serving contemporary cuisine for the last 19 years in the heart of Bottesford, Nottinghamshire. Along with our formal restaurant they have a wine lounge which is a relaxed place to spend the evening. They have a large selection of wines, beers and non-alcoholic beverages with a range of teas and coffees available. 1 Market St, Bottesford, Nottingham NG13 0BW -01949 842375
Charming restaurant in the heart of the Vale of Belvoir (Only a few Minutes walk away), serving modern world food in an intimate grade I listed building and providing intimate nooks for couples, as well as contemporary dining spaces. Wine bar at the back. The Thatch Restaurant, 26 High St, Bottesford, Nottingham NG13 0AA - 01949 842330
The Thatch Restaurant
26 High St
Charming restaurant in the heart of the Vale of Belvoir (Only a few Minutes walk away), serving modern world food in an intimate grade I listed building and providing intimate nooks for couples, as well as contemporary dining spaces. Wine bar at the back. The Thatch Restaurant, 26 High St, Bottesford, Nottingham NG13 0AA - 01949 842330
Amongst the rolling countryside of South Nottinghamshire, the vines of Hanwell Wine Estate are being hand-tended, to grow grapes for English Sparkling Wine. Saturday wine sales Cafe (opening Easter) Vineyard Tours Extensive range of workshops and events 26 June – Wine & Craft Festival Vineyard owners, William and Helenka Brown, planted the traditional Champagne-variety vines in 2012. Hanwell Wine Estate is the destination in Nottinghamshire for you to enjoy the great outdoors and delight in hand crafted English Sparkling Wine. Melton Road Hickling Pastures LE14 3QG
7 moradores locais recomendam
Hanwell Wine Estate
Melton Road
7 moradores locais recomendam
Amongst the rolling countryside of South Nottinghamshire, the vines of Hanwell Wine Estate are being hand-tended, to grow grapes for English Sparkling Wine. Saturday wine sales Cafe (opening Easter) Vineyard Tours Extensive range of workshops and events 26 June – Wine & Craft Festival Vineyard owners, William and Helenka Brown, planted the traditional Champagne-variety vines in 2012. Hanwell Wine Estate is the destination in Nottinghamshire for you to enjoy the great outdoors and delight in hand crafted English Sparkling Wine. Melton Road Hickling Pastures LE14 3QG
Local country pub - 2 High Street, Bottesford, United Kingdom, NG13 0AA
The Rutland Arms
2 High St
Local country pub - 2 High Street, Bottesford, United Kingdom, NG13 0AA
Spice India- (Only a few minutes walk away) Indian restaurant and Take away - 01949 845152 2 High Street, Bottesford, Nottingham, NG130AA
Spice India
2 High St
Spice India- (Only a few minutes walk away) Indian restaurant and Take away - 01949 845152 2 High Street, Bottesford, Nottingham, NG130AA

City/town information

Newark is one of the most interesting and attractive towns on the River Trent. The town is steeped in history, with a picturesque old ruined castle overlooking the river, a large cobbled market square and a wealth of fine old buildings. Newark's Historic Market Place. Once an important centre for the wool and cloth trade (from the 12th-C onwards), the town is situated at the junction of two ancient highways; the Great North Road and the Fosse Way. The town is also sited at the crossing of two major railway lines; the East Coast Main Line and the Nottingham to Lincoln Line. Today Newark is large busy place surrounded by industry and modern housing but much of the old town and market area has survived relatively untouched, and is full of charm and character. It is certainly worth visiting Newark on a market day to see the old cobbled square filled with rows of colourful stalls, selling all kinds of wareic Market Place.
46 moradores locais recomendam
Newark-on-Trent
46 moradores locais recomendam
Newark is one of the most interesting and attractive towns on the River Trent. The town is steeped in history, with a picturesque old ruined castle overlooking the river, a large cobbled market square and a wealth of fine old buildings. Newark's Historic Market Place. Once an important centre for the wool and cloth trade (from the 12th-C onwards), the town is situated at the junction of two ancient highways; the Great North Road and the Fosse Way. The town is also sited at the crossing of two major railway lines; the East Coast Main Line and the Nottingham to Lincoln Line. Today Newark is large busy place surrounded by industry and modern housing but much of the old town and market area has survived relatively untouched, and is full of charm and character. It is certainly worth visiting Newark on a market day to see the old cobbled square filled with rows of colourful stalls, selling all kinds of wareic Market Place.
A ancient market town know for its coaching inns and as the home town of several important leaders in their fields. Margaret Thatcher, Britain's first woman Prime Minister, was born in Grantham and the town museum has a permanent exhibition to her memory.
19 moradores locais recomendam
Grantham
19 moradores locais recomendam
A ancient market town know for its coaching inns and as the home town of several important leaders in their fields. Margaret Thatcher, Britain's first woman Prime Minister, was born in Grantham and the town museum has a permanent exhibition to her memory.
The only home of the Melton Mowbray Pork Pie It’s one of the oldest market towns in the country and probably best known for it's signature pork pie and Stilton cheese. If you’re a foodie (let’s face it, who isn’t) then Melton Mowbray is the perfect destination boasting a calendar full of food related festivals, including the National Pie Awards, Chocfest, internationally renowned East Midlands Food Festival and the largest Artisan Cheese Fair in the country. It’s no wonder Melton Mowbray is known as the ‘Rural Capital of Food’
17 moradores locais recomendam
Melton Mowbray
17 moradores locais recomendam
The only home of the Melton Mowbray Pork Pie It’s one of the oldest market towns in the country and probably best known for it's signature pork pie and Stilton cheese. If you’re a foodie (let’s face it, who isn’t) then Melton Mowbray is the perfect destination boasting a calendar full of food related festivals, including the National Pie Awards, Chocfest, internationally renowned East Midlands Food Festival and the largest Artisan Cheese Fair in the country. It’s no wonder Melton Mowbray is known as the ‘Rural Capital of Food’

Car Boot

Friendly car boot and market with; * Large, flat parking and pitch areas * Catering van * Clean toilets * Wheelchair access * Friendly and helpful staff Arena UK Allington Nr, Grantham NG32 2EF
Allington Car Boot and Market
Friendly car boot and market with; * Large, flat parking and pitch areas * Catering van * Clean toilets * Wheelchair access * Friendly and helpful staff Arena UK Allington Nr, Grantham NG32 2EF
Giant car boot sale every Sunday morning, open from 7am to 2pm. Postcode NG13 0EE
Bottesford Giant Car Boot Sale
Grantham Road
Giant car boot sale every Sunday morning, open from 7am to 2pm. Postcode NG13 0EE

Local Walks or Bike rides

Length of walk – 2 miles This walk near Grantham takes you from the village of Denton to Denton Reservoir. It’s a lovely spot with nice views across the water and lots of wildlife to look out for. Birdwatchers come to the site to see coot, moorhen, mallard, teal, pochard, heron, great crested grebe and kingfishers. The reservoir is located a short distance from the centre of the village. Starting on Church Street head east to Casthorpe Road and then turn north. Shortly after you will see a footpath on your right which will take you up to the reservoir. Here you will find a nice grassy footpath around the perimeter. The whole route is about 2 miles but if you feel like stretching your legs further you can head to the nearby Grantham Canal. Following the towpath east will take you into Grantham while heading west leads you towards Woolsthorpe. Around here you can pick up the long distance Viking Way and visit the splendid Belvoir Castle with its lakes, woodland and parkland. Also nearby is the pretty village of Knipton where there are some nice country lanes along Knipton Reservoir.
Denton Reservoir (Grantham Canal)
Length of walk – 2 miles This walk near Grantham takes you from the village of Denton to Denton Reservoir. It’s a lovely spot with nice views across the water and lots of wildlife to look out for. Birdwatchers come to the site to see coot, moorhen, mallard, teal, pochard, heron, great crested grebe and kingfishers. The reservoir is located a short distance from the centre of the village. Starting on Church Street head east to Casthorpe Road and then turn north. Shortly after you will see a footpath on your right which will take you up to the reservoir. Here you will find a nice grassy footpath around the perimeter. The whole route is about 2 miles but if you feel like stretching your legs further you can head to the nearby Grantham Canal. Following the towpath east will take you into Grantham while heading west leads you towards Woolsthorpe. Around here you can pick up the long distance Viking Way and visit the splendid Belvoir Castle with its lakes, woodland and parkland. Also nearby is the pretty village of Knipton where there are some nice country lanes along Knipton Reservoir.
Grantham Canal The canal opened in 1797 and officially closed in 1936, although traffic declined when the railways first arrived in 1850. It once carried coal, road stone, lime and night soil into the area and agricultural produce out. The canal falls 139 feet between Grantham and Nottingham by means of eighteen locks, but there are none to be seen on these walks. This level section extends for twenty miles between Stragglethorpe and Muston, winding gently through the countryside. Only occasionally was it necessary to dig cuttings or build embankments such as the one at Redmile. At Barkestone there are two examples of the once abundant hump backed bridge. Most farm tracks had swing bridges which, as they rotted, were replaced with fixed concrete decks. The canal is maintained by British Waterways and The Grantham Canal Society exists which aims to see the canal restored to navigation.
Grantham Canal
Grantham Canal The canal opened in 1797 and officially closed in 1936, although traffic declined when the railways first arrived in 1850. It once carried coal, road stone, lime and night soil into the area and agricultural produce out. The canal falls 139 feet between Grantham and Nottingham by means of eighteen locks, but there are none to be seen on these walks. This level section extends for twenty miles between Stragglethorpe and Muston, winding gently through the countryside. Only occasionally was it necessary to dig cuttings or build embankments such as the one at Redmile. At Barkestone there are two examples of the once abundant hump backed bridge. Most farm tracks had swing bridges which, as they rotted, were replaced with fixed concrete decks. The canal is maintained by British Waterways and The Grantham Canal Society exists which aims to see the canal restored to navigation.
Barkestone to Plungar Circular Length of walk – 2 1/2 miles. Parking near Barkestone Church on Jericho Lane Follow directions for Barkestone circular walk to the canal, then immediately before the canal take the path on th left. in the second field turn half left across the field climbing to a projecting corner where a stile leads from this field. 1 Follow the hedge on the left to a stile, then cross two more fields and turn left on entering a third. Follow the hedge to a rough piece of field turn right to enter the garden of a bungalow then through a hedge to the road. 2 Turn left, then right past the church and right at the next junction. This is Granby Lane, follow this to the canal turning right to return along the towing path. Leave at the second bridge colimbing Jericho Lane back to the church.
Plungar Lane
Plungar Lane
Barkestone to Plungar Circular Length of walk – 2 1/2 miles. Parking near Barkestone Church on Jericho Lane Follow directions for Barkestone circular walk to the canal, then immediately before the canal take the path on th left. in the second field turn half left across the field climbing to a projecting corner where a stile leads from this field. 1 Follow the hedge on the left to a stile, then cross two more fields and turn left on entering a third. Follow the hedge to a rough piece of field turn right to enter the garden of a bungalow then through a hedge to the road. 2 Turn left, then right past the church and right at the next junction. This is Granby Lane, follow this to the canal turning right to return along the towing path. Leave at the second bridge colimbing Jericho Lane back to the church.
Cropwell Bishop & Cropwell Butler Length of walk – 6 miles Parking near Chequers Inn, Cropwell Bishop With your back to the pub, turn left to a junction, then right to the edge of the village. Cross the bridge over the dry canal and turn right along the tow-path. Opinions differ as to the reason for the canal’s drying out, but poor “puddling” of the canal bed is a popular theory. After a half a mile there is a bridge over the dry canal and the path runs beside a hedge to Hoe Hill Wood. Cross the stile and walk through the middle of the wood, then along the foot of a grass field. Go through the gate to join a farm track and go straight on until it swings right. At this point go through the gate to join a farm track and go straight on until it swings right. At this point go through the hand gate on the left and along the edge of a paddock. Continue at the edge of the next field to reach a road, then turn right to the Green at Cropwell Butler. For refreshments at this point, follow Main Street to the right to the Plough Inn. To continue the walk, turn left at the Green along Main Street as far as the signposted ginnel on the right, opposite Court Cottage. Passing between the houses, join a farm track which passes the Grange. The path goes straight ahead for nearly a mile; fllow the farm track until it swings left, then leave it and continue along a headland. Join another farm track, then , one field short of New Bank Farm, turn right on a grass track with the hedge on your right. there is now a clear view across the Vale of Belvoir to the Terrace Hills, with Belvoir Castle half left on the skyline. At the end of the field, the track swings right but the path continues ahead with the hedge now on your left. At the foot of the field there is a footbridge across a tributary of the River Smite. Cross this and turn right, then left at the corner of the field to walk beside a wind-break of willow and poplar. Following the headland, you arrive at the tiny village of Tithby. Keep ahead past Church Farm House to a corner where an AA sign tells you that it is nine and a half miles to Nottingham, two and a half to Bingham, and a hundred and seventeen and a half to London. Turn right past the 13th Century church, which also serves Cropwell Butler. It has a curious appearance with lower courses in limestone, much of the upper parts and mullions in sandstone, and a brick tower. Inside it still has its box pews. At the end of the village there is a footbridge over the ditch on the left, a stlie and signpost. The path follows the edge of a pasture. You are now following a farm track, and continuing to the corner of the field. Cross a grass track and another protected wire, then cut off the corner of the next field to a wire ‘stile’ and a footbridge. The next stile is near the left hand corner of the next field, shaded by an ash tree, and brings you out on a narrow road. Turn right along the road as far as a signpost on your right. The path you now follow is virtually straight across or along the edge of seven fields. After the first arable field there are two grass paddocks then, in the fourth field, ignore the gap ahead and aim 25 yards to the right of it to find the stile. The path is well way marked across two more fields and along the headland of another. At the end, beside a high hedge, turn left to head for the corner of a high fence which encloses a school playing field. Go ahead beside the fence, then across a grass field to a road. Turn right into Cropwell Bishop and right again at the church to return to your starting point.
Cropwell Bishop Road & Cropwell Butler Road
Cropwell Bishop & Cropwell Butler Length of walk – 6 miles Parking near Chequers Inn, Cropwell Bishop With your back to the pub, turn left to a junction, then right to the edge of the village. Cross the bridge over the dry canal and turn right along the tow-path. Opinions differ as to the reason for the canal’s drying out, but poor “puddling” of the canal bed is a popular theory. After a half a mile there is a bridge over the dry canal and the path runs beside a hedge to Hoe Hill Wood. Cross the stile and walk through the middle of the wood, then along the foot of a grass field. Go through the gate to join a farm track and go straight on until it swings right. At this point go through the gate to join a farm track and go straight on until it swings right. At this point go through the hand gate on the left and along the edge of a paddock. Continue at the edge of the next field to reach a road, then turn right to the Green at Cropwell Butler. For refreshments at this point, follow Main Street to the right to the Plough Inn. To continue the walk, turn left at the Green along Main Street as far as the signposted ginnel on the right, opposite Court Cottage. Passing between the houses, join a farm track which passes the Grange. The path goes straight ahead for nearly a mile; fllow the farm track until it swings left, then leave it and continue along a headland. Join another farm track, then , one field short of New Bank Farm, turn right on a grass track with the hedge on your right. there is now a clear view across the Vale of Belvoir to the Terrace Hills, with Belvoir Castle half left on the skyline. At the end of the field, the track swings right but the path continues ahead with the hedge now on your left. At the foot of the field there is a footbridge across a tributary of the River Smite. Cross this and turn right, then left at the corner of the field to walk beside a wind-break of willow and poplar. Following the headland, you arrive at the tiny village of Tithby. Keep ahead past Church Farm House to a corner where an AA sign tells you that it is nine and a half miles to Nottingham, two and a half to Bingham, and a hundred and seventeen and a half to London. Turn right past the 13th Century church, which also serves Cropwell Butler. It has a curious appearance with lower courses in limestone, much of the upper parts and mullions in sandstone, and a brick tower. Inside it still has its box pews. At the end of the village there is a footbridge over the ditch on the left, a stlie and signpost. The path follows the edge of a pasture. You are now following a farm track, and continuing to the corner of the field. Cross a grass track and another protected wire, then cut off the corner of the next field to a wire ‘stile’ and a footbridge. The next stile is near the left hand corner of the next field, shaded by an ash tree, and brings you out on a narrow road. Turn right along the road as far as a signpost on your right. The path you now follow is virtually straight across or along the edge of seven fields. After the first arable field there are two grass paddocks then, in the fourth field, ignore the gap ahead and aim 25 yards to the right of it to find the stile. The path is well way marked across two more fields and along the headland of another. At the end, beside a high hedge, turn left to head for the corner of a high fence which encloses a school playing field. Go ahead beside the fence, then across a grass field to a road. Turn right into Cropwell Bishop and right again at the church to return to your starting point.
Redmile Circular Length of walk – 1 mile Go down Church Lane to the very end, turn left around the last house. Go through the gate and follow a green lane which turns left after 0.5 mile and ends at a wooden gate. Go through the gate, turn left and cross a stile, follow the hedge on the right but increasing your distance from it to about 20 yards to cross a bridge over a stream. Continue past the corner of a projecting field on your left to a stile then a gate between farm buildings. Go through this gate and continue to a stile and path by the school field to emerge on the main street.
Redmile
Redmile Circular Length of walk – 1 mile Go down Church Lane to the very end, turn left around the last house. Go through the gate and follow a green lane which turns left after 0.5 mile and ends at a wooden gate. Go through the gate, turn left and cross a stile, follow the hedge on the right but increasing your distance from it to about 20 yards to cross a bridge over a stream. Continue past the corner of a projecting field on your left to a stile then a gate between farm buildings. Go through this gate and continue to a stile and path by the school field to emerge on the main street.
Redmile Circular Walk 2 Length of walk – 3.5 Miles Go down Church Lane, Redmile to the very end, cross the cattle grid and turn right across the field to a stile by the Ash tree. Cross the stile and bear left to pass through a gate and continue diagonally across the field to the far corner, head for the spire of Barkestone Church. Cross a stile and continue across the field. Cross two waymarketd stiles and enter Barkestone by a gate onto Fishpond Lane. Walk through the village to the church and continue down Jericho Lane to the canal, then turn right using the tow path to return to Redmile.
Redmile
Redmile Circular Walk 2 Length of walk – 3.5 Miles Go down Church Lane, Redmile to the very end, cross the cattle grid and turn right across the field to a stile by the Ash tree. Cross the stile and bear left to pass through a gate and continue diagonally across the field to the far corner, head for the spire of Barkestone Church. Cross a stile and continue across the field. Cross two waymarketd stiles and enter Barkestone by a gate onto Fishpond Lane. Walk through the village to the church and continue down Jericho Lane to the canal, then turn right using the tow path to return to Redmile.
Walk – Harlaxton loop via Denton & Harlaxton Manor 6 miles (approx. 2.5 hours) Elevation 213 feet Ancient Monument, Birds, Butterflies, Church, Flowers, Food Shop, Good for Kids, Great Views, Lake/Loch, Mostly Flat, Pub, Public Transport, Stately Home, Wildlife, Woodland The walk is set in the Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, not far from the A1 and Grantham. The route is generally flat and across agricultural land, but includes a couple of miles of quiet country roads or lanes with broad grass verges. The walk ends with a visit to a magnificent 19th Century manor-house. ‘Harlaxton Manor was built in the 1830s for Gregory Gregory, a Nottinghamshire businessman, to replace the original Elizabethan Manor House in Harlaxton Village. Gregory employed Anthony Salvin as architect and Harlaxton Manor must be regarded as Salvin’s masterpiece. Built in Ancaster stone, it is an exuberant merging of Gothic, Jacobean and Baroque styles, creating an unforgettable and dramatic impact. Owner and architect had many differences of opinion, however. Salvin, having completed the exterior of the main building, was replaced by William Burn who is thought responsible for much of the interior. The house is now owned by the University of Evansville, Indiana, USA and is used as their British Campus’. (Culled from Harlaxton Manor website). Information for Dog Owners: this walk is considered suitable for biddable dogs. Access info: Harlaxton Village lies just off the A1 and A607. Park in the village centre in the lay-by near the war memorial and telephone kiosk, at the junction of High Street and Church Street; map ref SK 884316. Sat Nav: NG32 1HB Additional info: The Gregory Pub and Dining Rooms, The Drift, Harlaxton is situated just north of the A607 road; telephone 01476-577076. Harlaxton Village Store and Post Office: 01476-577155. ‘Every year Harlaxton College stages many weddings, conferences, summer residential programmes and special events, welcoming many thousands of visitors from across the world. Harlaxton Manor provides a warm welcome for all visitors as well as providing essential venue services for event organisers’. (Culled from Harlaxton Manor website). 1 From lay-by by telephone kiosk, turn up Church Street. Then turn right. 2 Reach Church of St Mary and St Peter. 3 Leave churchyard via gate to left and walk straight on alongside hedge. Pass through small yard, then enter paddock via gate with chain. 4 Bear left across paddock to exit via another gate. 5 Cross road to reach metal field-gate, which I found easier to climb than to open. Now head due south across fields… 6 … over several stiles… 7 .. and pass through trees… 8 .. then along path in next field. to reach and cross track by Wealdmore Lodge Farm (where you might be barked at, then greeted joyously, by small, nondescript dog). 9 Passing through double wooden field-gates, carry on ahead alongside hedge. 10 Reach metal steps up to lane. Turn right along lane, using broad grass verge. 11 Pass outskirts of Hungerton… 12 .. and continue along lane. At next crossroads, turn right towards Denton. Views open up along here and Belvoir Castle may be seen in distance on left. 13 After nearly one mile your lane descends and Denton appears below. Carry on down. 14 Reach A607 road at gatehouse to Denton Manor. Carefully cross A607 and walk into Denton. 15 Look out for public footpath between houses on right. (Footpath sign is further in on telegraph pole). Footpath leads into meadow. 16 Cross footbridge near fallen tree. Now walk uphill and cross track and two more stiles. 17 Walk up another rise, with church spire at Harlaxton presently coming into view. Soon you must cross that busy A607 again. 18 Safely across, continue in similar direction across fields towards Harlaxton. 19 Cross stile to left of first house. Path leads back to church. Here retrace steps down Church Street to reach High Street and your car. To complete walk, proceed left along High Street past village store. 20 After Number 17, turn right through gate onto footpath. 21 Shortly you turn right onto long approach drive… 22 … cross bridge over lake, pass walled garden and… 23 …. approach gatehouse. Immediately before gatehouse is drive to right, which serves as exit from Harlaxton Manor. This will be your way back. Pass through gatehouse. 24 See Harlaxton Manor in all its glory. Return through gatehouse. 25 Take exit drive, now on your left. 26 As you proceed along exit drive, take your last look back. Carry on into Manor Drive and out onto road, where turn right back to start.
Harlaxton
Walk – Harlaxton loop via Denton & Harlaxton Manor 6 miles (approx. 2.5 hours) Elevation 213 feet Ancient Monument, Birds, Butterflies, Church, Flowers, Food Shop, Good for Kids, Great Views, Lake/Loch, Mostly Flat, Pub, Public Transport, Stately Home, Wildlife, Woodland The walk is set in the Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, not far from the A1 and Grantham. The route is generally flat and across agricultural land, but includes a couple of miles of quiet country roads or lanes with broad grass verges. The walk ends with a visit to a magnificent 19th Century manor-house. ‘Harlaxton Manor was built in the 1830s for Gregory Gregory, a Nottinghamshire businessman, to replace the original Elizabethan Manor House in Harlaxton Village. Gregory employed Anthony Salvin as architect and Harlaxton Manor must be regarded as Salvin’s masterpiece. Built in Ancaster stone, it is an exuberant merging of Gothic, Jacobean and Baroque styles, creating an unforgettable and dramatic impact. Owner and architect had many differences of opinion, however. Salvin, having completed the exterior of the main building, was replaced by William Burn who is thought responsible for much of the interior. The house is now owned by the University of Evansville, Indiana, USA and is used as their British Campus’. (Culled from Harlaxton Manor website). Information for Dog Owners: this walk is considered suitable for biddable dogs. Access info: Harlaxton Village lies just off the A1 and A607. Park in the village centre in the lay-by near the war memorial and telephone kiosk, at the junction of High Street and Church Street; map ref SK 884316. Sat Nav: NG32 1HB Additional info: The Gregory Pub and Dining Rooms, The Drift, Harlaxton is situated just north of the A607 road; telephone 01476-577076. Harlaxton Village Store and Post Office: 01476-577155. ‘Every year Harlaxton College stages many weddings, conferences, summer residential programmes and special events, welcoming many thousands of visitors from across the world. Harlaxton Manor provides a warm welcome for all visitors as well as providing essential venue services for event organisers’. (Culled from Harlaxton Manor website). 1 From lay-by by telephone kiosk, turn up Church Street. Then turn right. 2 Reach Church of St Mary and St Peter. 3 Leave churchyard via gate to left and walk straight on alongside hedge. Pass through small yard, then enter paddock via gate with chain. 4 Bear left across paddock to exit via another gate. 5 Cross road to reach metal field-gate, which I found easier to climb than to open. Now head due south across fields… 6 … over several stiles… 7 .. and pass through trees… 8 .. then along path in next field. to reach and cross track by Wealdmore Lodge Farm (where you might be barked at, then greeted joyously, by small, nondescript dog). 9 Passing through double wooden field-gates, carry on ahead alongside hedge. 10 Reach metal steps up to lane. Turn right along lane, using broad grass verge. 11 Pass outskirts of Hungerton… 12 .. and continue along lane. At next crossroads, turn right towards Denton. Views open up along here and Belvoir Castle may be seen in distance on left. 13 After nearly one mile your lane descends and Denton appears below. Carry on down. 14 Reach A607 road at gatehouse to Denton Manor. Carefully cross A607 and walk into Denton. 15 Look out for public footpath between houses on right. (Footpath sign is further in on telegraph pole). Footpath leads into meadow. 16 Cross footbridge near fallen tree. Now walk uphill and cross track and two more stiles. 17 Walk up another rise, with church spire at Harlaxton presently coming into view. Soon you must cross that busy A607 again. 18 Safely across, continue in similar direction across fields towards Harlaxton. 19 Cross stile to left of first house. Path leads back to church. Here retrace steps down Church Street to reach High Street and your car. To complete walk, proceed left along High Street past village store. 20 After Number 17, turn right through gate onto footpath. 21 Shortly you turn right onto long approach drive… 22 … cross bridge over lake, pass walled garden and… 23 …. approach gatehouse. Immediately before gatehouse is drive to right, which serves as exit from Harlaxton Manor. This will be your way back. Pass through gatehouse. 24 See Harlaxton Manor in all its glory. Return through gatehouse. 25 Take exit drive, now on your left. 26 As you proceed along exit drive, take your last look back. Carry on into Manor Drive and out onto road, where turn right back to start.
Kinoulton, Colston Bassett & Cropwell Bishop County/Area – Nottinghamshire Length – 8.5 miles / 13.8 km Ascent – 200 feet / 61 metres Grade – easy/mod Start –NG12 3GB (approx. location only) Walk Route Description A circular walk taking in Kinoulton, Cropwell Bishop & Colston Basset. There are small sections which walk along roads. The start is a small car park (grid ref SK678324) located on the east side of the minor road from Kinoulton to Cropwell Bishop. After parking walk south along this road over the Grantham Canal and descend the to towpath. Walk south west with the canal on your right. This section of the canal has water and is under restoration. The canal turns left at the Devil’s Elbow towards Kinoulton. On your right is Vimy Ridge Farm with its avenue of Lombardy trees which were originally planted in commemoration of the death of the owner’s son during World War One. The original planting was replaced as part of the Millennium celebrations. Reaching the next bridge (grid ref. SK675306) leave the canal towpath and walk east through the village of Kinoulton. Reaching the road junction at the heart of the village continue straight ahead on the lane leading to Hall Farm (grid ref. SK684314) where a bridleway leads across fields in a north easterly direction to join an enclosed track that leads to the attractive village of Colston Bassett where refreshments are available. Continue straight ahead passing the church on your right. At grid ref. SK700334 take the footpath on the left. This path leads past the remains of St Mary’s Church to reach a lane. Go straight across the lane and continue on the bridleway past Home Farm on your right. This leads into Pasture Lane, a track that leads to a road on the east side of Cropwell Bishop (grid ref. SK687354). Turn right and walk through the village to a road junction (grid ref. SK679355). Turn left here following a road heading south. After about 500 yards you are able to join the towpath alongside the Grantham Canal. This section of the canal was, at the time of writing, overgrown and dry. However there was evidence that work was in hand to restore the canal. Continue along the canal roughly south to return to the start point. More about St Mary’s, Colston Basset Colston Bassett – St Mary The ruins of St Mary’s Church stand on a low rise nearly a kilometre north east of the village of Colston Bassett. It was built on the site of an older church, probably Saxon. (A Saxon stone has been found nearby.) It was definitely in existence by 1135. The oldest visible part, according to Pevsner, is the walled-up Norman north arcade with circular piers but pointed arches. The south arcade was partly transitional, partly 14th century. Also of the 14th century are the chancel and tower arch, although the tower is 15th century with the typical frieze of this neighbourhood. Pevsner thought the south transept must have had ’a sumptuous window’ but it is now all gone. In the mid-18th century classical windows were inserted. Much of the building is of blocks of blue bias limestone in thin layers. Several different stones, eg white limestone and ironstone, were used for dressing and facing. There are a number of good slate headstones in the churchyard. The depopulation of the Wolds led to decline and by 1744 the church was in disrepair. Permission was granted to demolish the north aisle, arcade and transept and south porch. In 1892 the Diocese allowed the interior fittings and roof to be removed after Robert M Knowles of Colston Bassett Hall built the new church of St John the Divine in the village. Two bells were transferred to the latter and the screen went to Long Whatton All Saints, Leicestershire. However St Mary’s was never de-consecrated. In July 2005 a service of re-dedication was held in the ruins following restoration work, which began in 1994 led by John Severn. It is a scheduled Ancient Monument and is listed Grade I
Colston Bassett
Kinoulton, Colston Bassett & Cropwell Bishop County/Area – Nottinghamshire Length – 8.5 miles / 13.8 km Ascent – 200 feet / 61 metres Grade – easy/mod Start –NG12 3GB (approx. location only) Walk Route Description A circular walk taking in Kinoulton, Cropwell Bishop & Colston Basset. There are small sections which walk along roads. The start is a small car park (grid ref SK678324) located on the east side of the minor road from Kinoulton to Cropwell Bishop. After parking walk south along this road over the Grantham Canal and descend the to towpath. Walk south west with the canal on your right. This section of the canal has water and is under restoration. The canal turns left at the Devil’s Elbow towards Kinoulton. On your right is Vimy Ridge Farm with its avenue of Lombardy trees which were originally planted in commemoration of the death of the owner’s son during World War One. The original planting was replaced as part of the Millennium celebrations. Reaching the next bridge (grid ref. SK675306) leave the canal towpath and walk east through the village of Kinoulton. Reaching the road junction at the heart of the village continue straight ahead on the lane leading to Hall Farm (grid ref. SK684314) where a bridleway leads across fields in a north easterly direction to join an enclosed track that leads to the attractive village of Colston Bassett where refreshments are available. Continue straight ahead passing the church on your right. At grid ref. SK700334 take the footpath on the left. This path leads past the remains of St Mary’s Church to reach a lane. Go straight across the lane and continue on the bridleway past Home Farm on your right. This leads into Pasture Lane, a track that leads to a road on the east side of Cropwell Bishop (grid ref. SK687354). Turn right and walk through the village to a road junction (grid ref. SK679355). Turn left here following a road heading south. After about 500 yards you are able to join the towpath alongside the Grantham Canal. This section of the canal was, at the time of writing, overgrown and dry. However there was evidence that work was in hand to restore the canal. Continue along the canal roughly south to return to the start point. More about St Mary’s, Colston Basset Colston Bassett – St Mary The ruins of St Mary’s Church stand on a low rise nearly a kilometre north east of the village of Colston Bassett. It was built on the site of an older church, probably Saxon. (A Saxon stone has been found nearby.) It was definitely in existence by 1135. The oldest visible part, according to Pevsner, is the walled-up Norman north arcade with circular piers but pointed arches. The south arcade was partly transitional, partly 14th century. Also of the 14th century are the chancel and tower arch, although the tower is 15th century with the typical frieze of this neighbourhood. Pevsner thought the south transept must have had ’a sumptuous window’ but it is now all gone. In the mid-18th century classical windows were inserted. Much of the building is of blocks of blue bias limestone in thin layers. Several different stones, eg white limestone and ironstone, were used for dressing and facing. There are a number of good slate headstones in the churchyard. The depopulation of the Wolds led to decline and by 1744 the church was in disrepair. Permission was granted to demolish the north aisle, arcade and transept and south porch. In 1892 the Diocese allowed the interior fittings and roof to be removed after Robert M Knowles of Colston Bassett Hall built the new church of St John the Divine in the village. Two bells were transferred to the latter and the screen went to Long Whatton All Saints, Leicestershire. However St Mary’s was never de-consecrated. In July 2005 a service of re-dedication was held in the ruins following restoration work, which began in 1994 led by John Severn. It is a scheduled Ancient Monument and is listed Grade I
Woolsthorpe by Belvoir and Belvoir Castle Length of Walk – 14 miles The pretty Lincolnshire village of Woolsthorpe by Belvoir is a splendid place for walking. Several waymarked long distance trails pass through the area and the Grantham Canal runs just to the north of the village. There’s also the majestic grounds of the Grade I listed Belvoir Castle and some nice woodland trails through Stathern Woods and Barkestone Woods to enjoy. This 14 mile walk takes you on a tour of the area, visiting the canal, the Belvoir Estate and the nearby village of Stathern. There’s some moderate hill climbs with wonderful views of the Vale of Belvoir from the high points. The walk starts in the village and heads north along Sedgebrook Road to the delightful Woolsthorpe Wharf on the canal. You then head east along the canal to Longmoor Bridge before picking up a section of the Viking Way to take you back to the village. Here you pick up the Jubilee Way to take you through the Belvoir Estate, passing through Old Park Wood, Plungar Wood and Stathern Wood. The route then heads into the Leicestershire village of Stathern where you can enjoy refreshments before returning to the village. This walk follows public footpaths but for a fee you can explore the castle grounds during the summer months. In the castle there’s fine artwork, exquisite furniture and a museum detailing the interesting history of the castle. There’s also lovely footpaths taking you to pretty gardens, peaceful woodland and the two large lakes. To extend your walking in the area you could head east and visit Denton Reservoir where there’s a nice grassy footpath to follow around the water. You could also follow the canal east into the town of Grantham. Also nearby is the pretty village of Knipton where there are some nice country lanes along Knipton Reservoir.
87 moradores locais recomendam
Belvoir Castle
87 moradores locais recomendam
Woolsthorpe by Belvoir and Belvoir Castle Length of Walk – 14 miles The pretty Lincolnshire village of Woolsthorpe by Belvoir is a splendid place for walking. Several waymarked long distance trails pass through the area and the Grantham Canal runs just to the north of the village. There’s also the majestic grounds of the Grade I listed Belvoir Castle and some nice woodland trails through Stathern Woods and Barkestone Woods to enjoy. This 14 mile walk takes you on a tour of the area, visiting the canal, the Belvoir Estate and the nearby village of Stathern. There’s some moderate hill climbs with wonderful views of the Vale of Belvoir from the high points. The walk starts in the village and heads north along Sedgebrook Road to the delightful Woolsthorpe Wharf on the canal. You then head east along the canal to Longmoor Bridge before picking up a section of the Viking Way to take you back to the village. Here you pick up the Jubilee Way to take you through the Belvoir Estate, passing through Old Park Wood, Plungar Wood and Stathern Wood. The route then heads into the Leicestershire village of Stathern where you can enjoy refreshments before returning to the village. This walk follows public footpaths but for a fee you can explore the castle grounds during the summer months. In the castle there’s fine artwork, exquisite furniture and a museum detailing the interesting history of the castle. There’s also lovely footpaths taking you to pretty gardens, peaceful woodland and the two large lakes. To extend your walking in the area you could head east and visit Denton Reservoir where there’s a nice grassy footpath to follow around the water. You could also follow the canal east into the town of Grantham. Also nearby is the pretty village of Knipton where there are some nice country lanes along Knipton Reservoir.
Vale of Belvoir A long circular walk through the lovely Vale of Belvoir on the borders of Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire. It’s a varied walk with woodland trails, waterside paths along the Grantham Canal and a visit to the splendid Belvoir Castle. The walk runs for about 15 miles with some moderate climbing at the start through the Belvoir Estate. The remainder of the route is fairly easy going with nice flat paths from Stathern onwards. The walk starts in the Lincolnshire village of Woolsthorpe by Belvoir and heads west along the Jubilee Way to Belvoir Castle in Leicestershire. The Grade I listed stately home is the ancestral seat of the family of the Dukes of Rutland. It was rebuilt in the Gothic Revival style in 1832 and is surrounded by a huge estate with lakes and woodland. From the elevated position of the castle there are magnificent views over the Vale of Belvoir. For a fee you can explore the castle grounds and inside view the fine artwork, exquisite furniture and museum detailing the interesting history of the castle. You continue west through the Barkestone Wood to the village of Stathern. The route then turns north to follow footpaths through the countryside to Plungar, where you pick up the canal. The now disused canal runs for 33 miles (53 km) from Grantham, falling through 18 locks to West Bridgford where it joins the River Trent. This section follows the canal east past Redmile, the pretty Bottesford Wharf and Longore Bridge before coming to Woolsthorpe Wharf. There’s pretty locks, an old bridge and a nice canal-side country pub which is great for refreshments here. Shortly after you return to the village and the finish point for the walk. To continue your walking in the area you could head south of Belvoir to Knipton Reservoir and visit the pretty villages of Knipton and Branston.
Vale of Belvoir AONB
Vale of Belvoir A long circular walk through the lovely Vale of Belvoir on the borders of Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire. It’s a varied walk with woodland trails, waterside paths along the Grantham Canal and a visit to the splendid Belvoir Castle. The walk runs for about 15 miles with some moderate climbing at the start through the Belvoir Estate. The remainder of the route is fairly easy going with nice flat paths from Stathern onwards. The walk starts in the Lincolnshire village of Woolsthorpe by Belvoir and heads west along the Jubilee Way to Belvoir Castle in Leicestershire. The Grade I listed stately home is the ancestral seat of the family of the Dukes of Rutland. It was rebuilt in the Gothic Revival style in 1832 and is surrounded by a huge estate with lakes and woodland. From the elevated position of the castle there are magnificent views over the Vale of Belvoir. For a fee you can explore the castle grounds and inside view the fine artwork, exquisite furniture and museum detailing the interesting history of the castle. You continue west through the Barkestone Wood to the village of Stathern. The route then turns north to follow footpaths through the countryside to Plungar, where you pick up the canal. The now disused canal runs for 33 miles (53 km) from Grantham, falling through 18 locks to West Bridgford where it joins the River Trent. This section follows the canal east past Redmile, the pretty Bottesford Wharf and Longore Bridge before coming to Woolsthorpe Wharf. There’s pretty locks, an old bridge and a nice canal-side country pub which is great for refreshments here. Shortly after you return to the village and the finish point for the walk. To continue your walking in the area you could head south of Belvoir to Knipton Reservoir and visit the pretty villages of Knipton and Branston.

Attractions

Little Jacks Farm and Garden Centre is a family run childrens farm and garden centre Adventure Playground Outside Games Equipment Sand Pits Indoor Craft & Soft Play Area Picnic Area Cafe Toilet Facilities including Disabled access & Baby changing Animal Farm & Gift Shop Large Car Park Orston Lane Bottesford Notts NG13 0AU
Little Jack's Farm and Garden Centre
Orston Lane
Little Jacks Farm and Garden Centre is a family run childrens farm and garden centre Adventure Playground Outside Games Equipment Sand Pits Indoor Craft & Soft Play Area Picnic Area Cafe Toilet Facilities including Disabled access & Baby changing Animal Farm & Gift Shop Large Car Park Orston Lane Bottesford Notts NG13 0AU
Melton Mowbray Market is the largest town centre livestock market in the country and has been in existence for 1,000 years, predating the Domesday Book. The main market has been held on a Tuesday since at least 1324 when it was granted a charter by King Edward II. The Tuesday and Friday markets are among the most popular regular events in Melton today, with car boot sales on a Sunday. The market also plays host to the incredibly successful & popular food, chocolate & cheese fairs. Check out the Events page for full details. Melton Mowbray Market Scalford Road Melton Mowbray Leicestershire LE13 1JY
9 moradores locais recomendam
Melton Mowbray Market
9 moradores locais recomendam
Melton Mowbray Market is the largest town centre livestock market in the country and has been in existence for 1,000 years, predating the Domesday Book. The main market has been held on a Tuesday since at least 1324 when it was granted a charter by King Edward II. The Tuesday and Friday markets are among the most popular regular events in Melton today, with car boot sales on a Sunday. The market also plays host to the incredibly successful & popular food, chocolate & cheese fairs. Check out the Events page for full details. Melton Mowbray Market Scalford Road Melton Mowbray Leicestershire LE13 1JY
The Wildflower Farm Tea Room serves a wide selection of homemade cakes and a variety of teas, coffees and other hot drinks plus hot and cold food. Ice creams and soft drinks are also available. There is a plant sales area attached to the Tea Room which offers approximately 200 different species of native wildflowers in 9cm pots; additionally there are herbs, cottage garden plants, roses and climbers available. Coach Gap Lane Langar Nottinghamshire NG13 9HP 01949 860592
Naturescape
Coach Gap Lane
The Wildflower Farm Tea Room serves a wide selection of homemade cakes and a variety of teas, coffees and other hot drinks plus hot and cold food. Ice creams and soft drinks are also available. There is a plant sales area attached to the Tea Room which offers approximately 200 different species of native wildflowers in 9cm pots; additionally there are herbs, cottage garden plants, roses and climbers available. Coach Gap Lane Langar Nottinghamshire NG13 9HP 01949 860592