Anthony’s guidebook

Anthony
Anthony’s guidebook

Food scene

Family restaurant serving good Italian and Maltese food. Try the pizza.
10 moradores locais recomendam
The Avenue Restaurant
10 moradores locais recomendam
Family restaurant serving good Italian and Maltese food. Try the pizza.
Excellent food, cocktails and wine selection
Tiffany
Excellent food, cocktails and wine selection
Good for morning coffee and pastries
6 moradores locais recomendam
La Crema SicilianA
6 moradores locais recomendam
Good for morning coffee and pastries
Very good Greek food
Manakis Greek Taverna
Very good Greek food
Located in front of the Marriott Hotel, The Villa is a good spot for drinks on the terrace over looking Balluta Bay.
Rosami At The Villa
Located in front of the Marriott Hotel, The Villa is a good spot for drinks on the terrace over looking Balluta Bay.
The Podium Caffe & Whiskey Lounge

Sightseeing

9 moradores locais recomendam
Saint-John's Cathedral Museum
9 moradores locais recomendam
58 moradores locais recomendam
Malta National Aquarium
58 moradores locais recomendam
The Knights Hospitallers
The Tarxien Temples (Maltese: It-Tempji ta' Ħal Tarxien, Maltese pronunciation: [tarˈʃɪːn]) are an archaeological complex in Tarxien, Malta. They date to approximately 3150 BC.[1] The site was accepted as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1992 along with the other Megalithic temples on the island of Malta.[2]
17 moradores locais recomendam
Templos de Tarxien
17 moradores locais recomendam
The Tarxien Temples (Maltese: It-Tempji ta' Ħal Tarxien, Maltese pronunciation: [tarˈʃɪːn]) are an archaeological complex in Tarxien, Malta. They date to approximately 3150 BC.[1] The site was accepted as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1992 along with the other Megalithic temples on the island of Malta.[2]
Ħaġar Qim (Maltese pronunciation: [ħadʒar ˈʔiːm]; "Standing/Worshipping Stones") is a megalithic temple complex found on the Mediterranean island of Malta, dating from the Ġgantija phase (3600-3200 BC).[1] The Megalithic Temples of Malta are among the most ancient religious sites on Earth,[2] described by the World Heritage Sites committee as "unique architectural masterpieces."[3] In 1992 UNESCO recognized Ħaġar Qim and four other Maltese megalithic structures as World Heritage Sites.[4] V. Gordon Childe, Professor of Prehistoric European Archeology and director of the Institute of Archaeology in the University of London from 1946-1957[5] visited Ħaġar Qim. He wrote, "I have been visiting the prehistoric ruins all round the Mediterranean, from Mesopotamia to Egypt, Greece and Switzerland, but I have nowhere seen a place as old as this one
76 moradores locais recomendam
Ħaġar Qim
76 moradores locais recomendam
Ħaġar Qim (Maltese pronunciation: [ħadʒar ˈʔiːm]; "Standing/Worshipping Stones") is a megalithic temple complex found on the Mediterranean island of Malta, dating from the Ġgantija phase (3600-3200 BC).[1] The Megalithic Temples of Malta are among the most ancient religious sites on Earth,[2] described by the World Heritage Sites committee as "unique architectural masterpieces."[3] In 1992 UNESCO recognized Ħaġar Qim and four other Maltese megalithic structures as World Heritage Sites.[4] V. Gordon Childe, Professor of Prehistoric European Archeology and director of the Institute of Archaeology in the University of London from 1946-1957[5] visited Ħaġar Qim. He wrote, "I have been visiting the prehistoric ruins all round the Mediterranean, from Mesopotamia to Egypt, Greece and Switzerland, but I have nowhere seen a place as old as this one
The Ta' Ħaġrat ([taˈħad͡ʒrat]) temples in Mġarr, Malta is recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with several other Megalithic temples.[1] They are amongst the world's oldest religious sites.[2] The larger Ta' Ħaġrat temple dates from the Ġgantija phase (3600–3200 BCE);[3] the smaller is dated to the Saflieni phase (3300–3000 BCE).
6 moradores locais recomendam
Ta' Ħaġrat Temples
6 moradores locais recomendam
The Ta' Ħaġrat ([taˈħad͡ʒrat]) temples in Mġarr, Malta is recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with several other Megalithic temples.[1] They are amongst the world's oldest religious sites.[2] The larger Ta' Ħaġrat temple dates from the Ġgantija phase (3600–3200 BCE);[3] the smaller is dated to the Saflieni phase (3300–3000 BCE).
PREBOOKING ONLY https://booking.heritagemalta.org The Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum is an underground prehistoric burial site. Discovered in 1902 during construction works, the site was first excavated by Fr Emmanuel Magri between 1903 and 1906. Fr Magri died in Tunisia and his excavation notes have not been found. Excavations were taken over by Sir Themistocles Zammit, who continued works until 1911. The Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum is a complex made up of interconnecting rock-cut chambers set on three distinct levels. The complex was used over a span of many centuries, with the earliest remains dating back to about 4000 BC and the more recent remains found dating to the Early Bronze Age (ca 1500BC).
40 moradores locais recomendam
Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum
40 moradores locais recomendam
PREBOOKING ONLY https://booking.heritagemalta.org The Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum is an underground prehistoric burial site. Discovered in 1902 during construction works, the site was first excavated by Fr Emmanuel Magri between 1903 and 1906. Fr Magri died in Tunisia and his excavation notes have not been found. Excavations were taken over by Sir Themistocles Zammit, who continued works until 1911. The Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum is a complex made up of interconnecting rock-cut chambers set on three distinct levels. The complex was used over a span of many centuries, with the earliest remains dating back to about 4000 BC and the more recent remains found dating to the Early Bronze Age (ca 1500BC).

City/town information

Valletta (or Il-Belt) is the tiny capital of the Mediterranean island nation of Malta. The walled city was established in the 1500s on a peninsula by the Knights of St. John, a Roman Catholic order. It’s known for museums, palaces and grand churches. Baroque landmarks include St. John’s Co-Cathedral, whose opulent interior is home to the Caravaggio masterpiece "The Beheading of Saint John."
261 moradores locais recomendam
Valeta
261 moradores locais recomendam
Valletta (or Il-Belt) is the tiny capital of the Mediterranean island nation of Malta. The walled city was established in the 1500s on a peninsula by the Knights of St. John, a Roman Catholic order. It’s known for museums, palaces and grand churches. Baroque landmarks include St. John’s Co-Cathedral, whose opulent interior is home to the Caravaggio masterpiece "The Beheading of Saint John."
The history of Mdina traces back more than 4000 years. According to tradition it was here that in 60 A.D. that the Apostle St. Paul is said to have lived after being shipwrecked on the Islands. Furthermore it is said that St. Paul resided inside the grotto know as Fuori le Mura (outside the city walls) now known as St. Paul’s Grotto in Rabat. Lamp lit by night and referred to as “the silent city”, Mdina is fascinating to visit for its timeless atmosphere as well as its cultural and religious treasures. Mdina has had different names and titles depending on its rulers and its role but its medieval name describe it best – ‘Citta’ Notabile’: the noble city. It was home then, as now, to Malta’s noble families; some are descendants of the Norman, Sicilian and Spanish overlords who made Mdina their home from the 12th century onwards. Impressive palaces line its narrow, shady streets. Mdina is one of Europe’s finest examples of an ancient walled city and extraordinary in its mix of medieval and baroque architecture.
240 moradores locais recomendam
Mdina
240 moradores locais recomendam
The history of Mdina traces back more than 4000 years. According to tradition it was here that in 60 A.D. that the Apostle St. Paul is said to have lived after being shipwrecked on the Islands. Furthermore it is said that St. Paul resided inside the grotto know as Fuori le Mura (outside the city walls) now known as St. Paul’s Grotto in Rabat. Lamp lit by night and referred to as “the silent city”, Mdina is fascinating to visit for its timeless atmosphere as well as its cultural and religious treasures. Mdina has had different names and titles depending on its rulers and its role but its medieval name describe it best – ‘Citta’ Notabile’: the noble city. It was home then, as now, to Malta’s noble families; some are descendants of the Norman, Sicilian and Spanish overlords who made Mdina their home from the 12th century onwards. Impressive palaces line its narrow, shady streets. Mdina is one of Europe’s finest examples of an ancient walled city and extraordinary in its mix of medieval and baroque architecture.
St. Julian’s is a seaside town in Malta. It’s known for beaches like Balluta Bay, a rocky stretch with a promenade and restaurants. Bars and nightclubs line the streets of Paceville, an area south of St. George’s Bay Beach. Spinola Bay has traditional fishing boats, plus Spinola Palace, a baroque mansion with a carved clock centrepiece on its facade. Portomaso Bay is home to a marina and luxury boutiques. https://www.visitmalta.com/en/attraction/balluta-bay/
54 moradores locais recomendam
Saint Julian's
54 moradores locais recomendam
St. Julian’s is a seaside town in Malta. It’s known for beaches like Balluta Bay, a rocky stretch with a promenade and restaurants. Bars and nightclubs line the streets of Paceville, an area south of St. George’s Bay Beach. Spinola Bay has traditional fishing boats, plus Spinola Palace, a baroque mansion with a carved clock centrepiece on its facade. Portomaso Bay is home to a marina and luxury boutiques. https://www.visitmalta.com/en/attraction/balluta-bay/
The small and picturesque fishing village of Marsaxlokk (pronounced marsa-schlock – meaning southeastern port) is located in the South-Eastern part of Malta, adjacent to Żejtun, Marsaskala and Birżebbuġa. As a tourist destination, Marsaxlokk is popular for a few reasons: The town offers a selection of the finest fish restaurants on the island For the peaceful walks around the coast and harbour, as well as for its secluded and untainted swimming zones in the area around Marsaxlokk. Locals enjoy the nightlife especially in Summer when you can walk the promenade, grab an ice cream as you go and let the sea breeze cool off the typical Summer heat. On Sundays, many Maltese visit the Marsaxlokk fish market to buy fresh seafood from the morning’s catch.
111 moradores locais recomendam
Marsaxlokk
111 moradores locais recomendam
The small and picturesque fishing village of Marsaxlokk (pronounced marsa-schlock – meaning southeastern port) is located in the South-Eastern part of Malta, adjacent to Żejtun, Marsaskala and Birżebbuġa. As a tourist destination, Marsaxlokk is popular for a few reasons: The town offers a selection of the finest fish restaurants on the island For the peaceful walks around the coast and harbour, as well as for its secluded and untainted swimming zones in the area around Marsaxlokk. Locals enjoy the nightlife especially in Summer when you can walk the promenade, grab an ice cream as you go and let the sea breeze cool off the typical Summer heat. On Sundays, many Maltese visit the Marsaxlokk fish market to buy fresh seafood from the morning’s catch.

Neighborhoods

Paceville is a boisterous party district of late-night bars, Irish pubs, and music clubs on St. George’s Road, plus upscale bars at Portomaso Marina. Global dining options include pizzerias, curry houses, dim sum restaurants, and Lebanese cafes. The Bay Street Shopping Complex contains stores for Maltese lace and filigree jewelry, plus the MULTIMAXX game arcade. Casinos and upscale hotels edge the Mediterranean Sea.
130 moradores locais recomendam
Paceville
130 moradores locais recomendam
Paceville is a boisterous party district of late-night bars, Irish pubs, and music clubs on St. George’s Road, plus upscale bars at Portomaso Marina. Global dining options include pizzerias, curry houses, dim sum restaurants, and Lebanese cafes. The Bay Street Shopping Complex contains stores for Maltese lace and filigree jewelry, plus the MULTIMAXX game arcade. Casinos and upscale hotels edge the Mediterranean Sea.
Sliema is a resort town on the east coast of the Mediterranean island of Malta. The waterfront features a long promenade and the 18th-century polygonal Fort Tigné in the south. To the north, St. Julian’s Tower is a 17th-century watchtower and battery. The baroque-inspired Stella Maris Church dates from the 1850s. On tiny Manoel Island is the star-shaped Fort Manoel, built by the Knights of St. John.
6 moradores locais recomendam
Sliema Center
6 moradores locais recomendam
Sliema is a resort town on the east coast of the Mediterranean island of Malta. The waterfront features a long promenade and the 18th-century polygonal Fort Tigné in the south. To the north, St. Julian’s Tower is a 17th-century watchtower and battery. The baroque-inspired Stella Maris Church dates from the 1850s. On tiny Manoel Island is the star-shaped Fort Manoel, built by the Knights of St. John.

Conselho para os viajantes

Transporte

Bus and Taxi

Nearby bus stops give easy access to all areas of the island. There is also a bus stop nearby in front of Marriott Hotel for the open top tour bus and traditional Maltese buses. Taxi services such as ECABS and BOLT are available to book by App 24/7
Frases úteis

How do you say...

Grazzi ħafna Grats-ee hawf-na Thank you very much Bonġu Bon-ju Good morning Iva. Ee-va Yes Le Lay No Kif int? Kiff int How are you? Jekk jogħġbok. Yek yoh-jbok Please http://ilanguages.org/maltese_phrases.php
Não perca

Heritage Malta

Please visit this website for Heritage Site to visit in Malta. https://heritagemalta.org
Como economizar

Food Delivery Apps

WOLT - https://wolt.com BOLT - https://food.bolt.eu
Não perca

Visit Malta

https://www.visitmalta.com
Reserve antes de ir

Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum

Prebooking required https://heritagemalta.org/hal-saflieni-hypogeum/